Meets level 3 and more than one representation of the

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Meets level 3 and more than one representation of the patterns is used. Meets level 4 and all possible representations of the patterns are used. References Gildenhuys, DG & Paulsen, R. 1991. Mathematics in action.Pretoria: Kagiso Meserve, BE & Sobel, MA. 1964. Introduction to mathematics. 4th edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Miller, CD & Heeren, VE. 1978. Mathematical ideas.3rd edition. Glenview, IL: Scott,Foresman. Mottershead, L. 1978. Sources of mathematical discovery.Oxford: Blackwell. Sobel, MA& Maletsky, EM. 1975. Teaching mathematics: a sourcebook of aids, activities and strategies.Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
OPM1501/501/0/2020 112 UNIT 6:SPACE AND SHAPEUnit learning outcomes After working through this unit you should be able to explain the Van Hiele levels of geometrical thought describe and represent flats shapes describe and represent polygons, including triangles and quadrilaterals and their properties describe and represent space shapes describe and represent polyhedrons, including prisms and pyramids and their properties describe and represent nets of polyhedra describe and represent different views of geometric objects 6.1 Introduction to shapes Geometry is possibly one of the most neglected topics in schools. However, it is one of the most interesting topics, which can be made easily understandable to learners, provided they have the proper material to work with. In this unit, we use different types of materials. We also give this unit a theoretical underpinning, because teachers need to understand how learners learn geometry, and why it is important to follow a definite line of development and sequence when teaching the concepts of shapes to young learners. Let us look at the different geometric shapes we see in our daily lives. All shapes can be classified into two major parts: Space shapes oSpace shapes are objects that protrude in space (they “stand up” or “stick out” they “take up space”). Most of the shapes we see in our daily lives are space shapes. You as a person are a space shape. Flat shapes (we also call them plane shapes) oFlat shapes are shapes that lie flat. You can put a flat shape flat on a desk, and it will not stick up in space. What is a plane?
OPM1501/501/0/2020 113 Activity 6.1Which of the following objects are space shapes, and which are flat shapes? a telephone a page in your textbook a soccer ball a stop sign 6.2 Van Hiele’slevels of geometric thought For us to understand the way learners think about shapes, we examine research that was done years ago by Van Hiele. In 1957, Dutch educators Dina van Hiele-Geldof and Pierre van Hiele proposed that a learner’sunderstanding of geometrical concepts develops through five distinct levels.

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