Solidarity theory emphasizes positive qualities of the tie associated with

Solidarity theory emphasizes positive qualities of

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Solidarity theory emphasizes positive qualities of the tie associated with structural features o How positive qualities of this tie vary by generation and age o Intergenerational stake may increase as parents and children grow older Ambivalence model: emotional aspects of relationships between adults and their parents o Psychology and sociology o Intergenerational ambivalence also has been operationally defined in two ways: Simultaneous and conflicting emotions (positive and negative feelings) Subjective sense of feeling conflicted or torn
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Intergenerational ambivalence model has accrued important findings regarding qualities of intergenerational ties Ambivalence may not accurately portray the complexities of parent-child ties Negativity may account for the variability in parents/ and children’s relationship Support exchanges in intergenerational ties Intergenerational support: o Intergenerational support has been measured as involving one child and one parent o Considerable support exchanges occur between adults and their parents prior to the onset of parental health decline o Multidimensional Intergenerational Support Model Types of everyday support Financial Practical Emotional Advice Companionship Technical help Multiple family members Multiple grown children Middle aged adults Aging parents Varying needs Emotions involved in providing and responding to support Intergeneration Ties and Well-being o Emotional aspects of the tie and well-being Given the long history of the relationship from early life, parents and grown children who do not value their relationships may suffer emotional and physical consequences Mixed emotions and ambivalence in this tie are associated with diminished well- being Children’s problems are particularly detrimental for parents’ well-being o Support exchanges and well-being
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It is not clear whether support exchanges contribute to well-being for adults and their parents Current models implicitly assume that support is helpful to the recipient and stressful for the provider Receiving intense support from parents in young adulthood was beneficial for grown children Receiving support may be harmful if it undermines independence In summary, strong bonds between adults and their parents appear to be beneficial for both parties October 24 th : Cognitive Aging o Dimensions of cognition Knowledge Reasoning Solve problems Information Memory Changing with aging Fluid intelligence: processing and crucial, it gets worse with age Crystallized intelligence: what you know (like hard drive), with age it stays the same or gets better o Age changes in dimensions of cognition Seattle Longitudinal Study: study various aspects of psychological development during adult years One of the most extensive psychological research studies on how people develop and change through adulthood 1956 Tested every 7 years Cohorts comparison o 19 th century o 20 th before WWII o post WWII design allows comparisons of o age differences o individual changes
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  • Spring '08
  • JerrryManheimer

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