Research report - National Child Labour Action Programme for South Africa (1).doc

22 the national awareness campaign on child labour

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(22) The national awareness campaign on child labour should encourage the eradication of practices where children are involved in making or selling liquor, or work in establishments where they are exposed to liquor or clients buying liquor. Lead institution: DL; Secondary institution: SAPS. New policy? Yes. Costs and time line: see (18). (23) The national awareness campaign on child labour should highlight the disadvantages and dangers of adult work that encourages child labour. See 7.2. Lead institution: DL. Secondary institution: DTI. New Policy? Elaboration
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(24) Labour inspectors should receive training on how to address child labour. This should include training targeting specifically vulnerable or difficult sectors, such as domestic sector. Lead institution: DL. New policy? Elaboration of existing policy. Once off cost: minimal cost to design training material. Recurrent cost: moderate. Time line: within one year of adoption of policy. ILO funding: to cover once off cost. (25) Organisations running help lines, including a labour (e-governance line) call centre, should be informed fully about child labour issues, including trafficking and CSEC, through appropriate training materials and operations manuals. Lead institution: DL*. Secondary institutions: Organisations running help lines, NGOs, DSD. New policy? Yes. Once off costs: minimal. Recurrent cost: nil. Time line: To be introduced within one year of adoption of policy. ILO funding: to cover once off cost. (27) Officials of DrSD, DH, DL, DrE and DHA should be trained in ways of detecting other potentially serious cases of child labour and what action to take when it is found. Lead institution: DSD. Affected departments: DH, DrSD, DL, DrE, DHA. New policy? Yes. Once off costs: moderate. Recurrent cost: moderate. Time line: To be introduced within two years of adoption of policy. (31) Develop training materials for officials and NGOs that are likely to come into contact with 15-17 year olds involved in hazardous work or other WFCL, regarding alternative employment options for them. See also (111). Lead institution: DL. Secondary institution: DrSD. New policy? Elaboration of existing policy. Once off cost: moderate. Recurrent cost: minimal. Time line: within two years of adoption of policy. ILO funding: to cover once off costs. (32) Appropriate strategies should be found for provision of childcare facilities, especially in sectors and areas where children often have to look after their younger siblings, with a focus on rural poor. The Early Childhood Development (ECD) Programme of the Department of Education aims to provide such facilities for Grade 0/R children for the last year before school. However, effective provincial implementation of this programme must be speeded up and supported financially. Workplace-based child-care facilities should be encouraged. Lead institution: DSD*. Secondary institutions: DrE (grade 0/R), DL (workplace-based provision), LG (regarding crèche facilities funded or provided by local authorities). New policy? Elaboration of existing policy. Recurrent cost: moderate to substantial. Time line: To be introduced within three year of adoption of policy. Note: The
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