Characteristics of Developmental Periods

Children begin to compare their performance to that

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Children begin to compare their performance to that of others by: Why do they have fewer friends than other children their age, are they good enough to be picked for the baseball team, will they ever learn to read like the other kids, will they routinely end up on the losing side. Individual differences in academic performance become more noticeable with each passing year.
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5 CheckPoint In the elementary school years, children internalize many prohibitions they’ve heard repeatedly (“Don’t play near the river,” “Keep an eye on your little brother,” etc.). They gain a sense of what is expected of them, and most are inclined to live up to these expectations. Rules of games and required classroom behavior become important. Basic motor skills are notably stable during middle childhood, but many children gain increasing proficiency in athletic skills (McDevitt & Ormrod, 2004). Early Adolescence (10–14 Years): In early adolescence, youngsters slowly lose their childlike bodies and make strides toward reproductive maturation. Physical changes are accompanied by equally dramatic reorganizations in learning processes and relationships with parents and peers (McDevitt & Ormrod, 2004). Distinguishing Characteristics: Physical changes of puberty are orderly and predictable, but boys and girls alike often experience them as puzzling, disconcerting events. Young adolescents sometimes look and feel awkward, and hormonal changes can lead to unpredictable mood swings. Adolescents show increasing reflectivity about their changing selves and a heightened sensitivity to what other people think about them. They compare themselves to peers in middle childhood; they now consider how their peers might view them. They wonder what people are they thinking of them, why are people looking at me, what does my hair look, am I one of the “cool” kids. Peers become a sounding board through
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6 CheckPoint which adolescents gain social support and seek assurance that their appearance and behaviors are acceptable. Cognitive strides include expansion in abilities to think logically, abstractly, and exhaustively. The world views young adolescents broaden well beyond family and peer group.
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