Terms the state pursued a classic carrot and stick

This preview shows page 4 - 7 out of 12 pages.

terms, the state pursued a classic carrot-and-stick policy, eulogizing women 
who were models of self-abnegation, thrift, and productivity while arresting  activists and banning their publication the role of the girls higher schools should be to develop in young women  refined taste and gentle and modest character women of leisure, then should  receive enough education-but no more than necessary-to fulfill thir duties  within the home. The curriculum of the girls ‘ higher schools accordingly was  not the academic equal of that provided to young men in middle schools, and  it in no way prepared female students for entrance to higher schools became the guiding aphorism for government policy on women, and the  phrase resonates in Japanese society still today. “Modern Girl” (moga) Moga as symbol of modern: embodied all the thing that were threatening  about Japanese women in the modern era Women’s new place threatened patriarchal order & “good wife, wise mother”  Woman was becoming more like man both spiritually and physically First and foremost, modern girl was defined by her body and most specifically  by her short hair and long straight legs Was no longer secluded in the confines of the household, but was out in the  open, working and playing alongside men. This was her real transgression: she would not accept the division of labor that had placed her in the home Self-sufficiency o Modern girl had not simply abandoned motherhood. She was anti- motherhood. They are economic self-sufficiency. o “free living and free thinking o make her own money o use male word “I” o was crafty, manipulative, and intellectualizing. Free to go out, even to  sleep out, and maintained no boundaries o group-oriented, productive, and possessed of a self-consciousness. There were two kind of Moga. First one is that woman is with time and money to fashion herself brightly colored ensemble of Western clothing with match  hat. They were not “free” Taisho Democracy 1880s, “freedom and popular Rights Movement” pro-democracy movement o vivil right o elected legislature o reduced taxes o revision of unequal treaties with Europe and US Japanese Constitution (1889) o Instituted voting rights for men who paid property taxes o 1905-1920s: social movements flourished  o urban proletariat: socialism began to gain supporters in Japan o feminism, minority movements gained momentum o significance to women: roots of Japanese feminism borne during  FRPM o proto-feminist Fukuda Hideko supporter of FPRM
o women (some) paid property taxes but no voting rights week 4

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture