Fragmentation and Isolation The Parts Many researchers have noted the tendency

Fragmentation and isolation the parts many

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Fragmentation and Isolation: The Parts
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Many researchers have noted the tendency of instructional materials to gloss over unpleasant facts and events in our history. By ignoring prejudice, racism, discrimination, exploitation, oppression, sexism, and inter- group conflict, we deny students the information they need to recognize, understand, and perhaps some day conquer societal problems. Unreality: Rose Colored Glasses. This is an example of Unreality bias:
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This is an example of Cosmetic bias: Cosmetic Bias: "Shiny" covers. The relatively new cosmetic bias suggests that a text is bias free, but beyond the attractive covers, photos, or posters, bias persists. This "illusion of equity" is really a marketing strategy to give a favorable impression to potential purchasers who only flip the pages of books.
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This is an example of Linguistic bias: Linguistic Bias: Words Count. Language can be a powerful conveyor of bias, in both blatant and subtle forms. Linguistic bias can impact race/ethnicity, gender, accents, age, (dis)ability and sexual orientation. Linguistic Bias: Words Count.
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This is an example of Imbalance and Selectivity bias: Curriculum may perpetuate bias by presenting only one interpretation of an issue, situation, or group of people. Such accounts simplify and distort complex issues by omitting different perspectives. Imbalance and Selectivity: A Tale Half Told.
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10-Benevolence Mrs. Jeraldyn Carandang John Andrei Villegas Eliezer Managa Seven Forms of Bias in Instructional Materials
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