9781111640125_IM_ch12

Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals

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2. Explain that one pair of keys may be used to encrypt information, and the public key could be backed up to another location. The second pair would be used only for digital signatures, and the public key in that pair would never be backed up. Key Handling Procedures 1. Certain procedures can help ensure that keys are properly handled. These procedures include: a. Escrow b. Expiration c. Renewal d. Revocation e. Recovery i. Key recovery agent (KRA) ii. M-of-N control (see Figure 12-14) Teaching Tip Vincent Rijmen, one of the co-creators of AES, is also one of the designers of Whirlpool.
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Fourth Edition 12-7 f. Suspension g. Destruction Transport Encryption Algorithms 1. Mention that cryptographic transport protocols can be categorized by the applications that they are commonly used for: file transfer, Web, VPN, and e-mail. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)/Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1. Note that perhaps the most common transport encryption algorithm is Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), which is a protocol developed by Netscape for securely transmitting documents over the Internet. 2. Explain that SSL uses a public key to encrypt data that is transferred over the SSL connection. 3. Define Transport Layer Security (TLS) as a protocol that guarantees privacy and data integrity between applications communicating over the Internet. Secure Shell (SSH) 1. Explain that Secure Shell (SSH) is an encrypted alternative to the Telnet protocol that is used to access remote computers. 2. Explain that SSH is a Linux/UNIX-based command interface and protocol for securely accessing a remote computer. 3. Note that SSH is actually a suite of three utilities—slogin, ssh, and scp—that are secure versions of the unsecure UNIX counterpart utilities. Hypertext Transport Protocol over Secure Sockets Layer (HTTPS) 1. Explain that one common use of SSL is to secure Web Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP) communications between a browser and a Web server. 2. Note that this secure version is actually “plain” HTTP sent over SSL/TLS and is called Hypertext Transport Protocol over Secure Sockets Layer (HTTPS). Teaching Tip SSH is widely used by network administrators to remotely control UNIX-based Web servers.
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Fourth Edition 12-8 IP Security (IPsec) 1. Emphasize that security tools function at different layers of the Open System Interconnection (OSI) model. 2. Refer to Figure 12-12 to illustrate the security tools and the OSI model. 3. Define IP security (IPsec) as a set of protocols developed to support the secure exchange of packets. 4. Note that because it operates at a low level in the OSI model, IPsec is considered to be a transparent security protocol. 5. Explain that it is transparent to the following entities: a. Applications b. Users c. Software 6. Discuss the three areas of protection that IPsec provides that correspond to three IPsec protocol: a. Authentication b. Confidentiality c. Key management 7.
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  • Cryptography, Public key infrastructure, Public-key cryptography, Certificate authority, digital certificates, Network Security Fundamentals

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