Copyright 2017 Wolters Kluwer All Rights Reserved Narcotic Agonists cont

Copyright 2017 wolters kluwer all rights reserved

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Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer • All Rights Reserved Narcotic Agonists (cont.) Narcotic Agonists (cont.) Cautions Respiratory dysfunction GI or GU surgery Acute abdomen or ulcerative colitis Adverse Reactions Respiratory depression with apnea Cardiac arrest Shock Orthostatic hypotension Nausea, vomiting, constipation Biliary spasm Dizziness, psychoses, anxiety, fear, hallucinations Drug-to-Drug Interactions Barbiturate general anesthetics, phenothiazines, and MAOIs
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Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer • All Rights Reserved Prototype Narcotic Agonists Prototype Narcotic Agonists
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Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer • All Rights Reserved Question Question Identify a reason a narcotic agonist may be prescribed? A. Relief of minor pain B. Analgesia during anesthesia C. Analgesia during sleep D. Relief of moderate acute pain
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Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer • All Rights Reserved Answer Answer b. Analgesia during anesthesia Rationale: Indications: Relief of severe acute or chronic pain Analgesia during anesthesia Cross placenta
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Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer • All Rights Reserved Narcotic Agonists–Antagonists Narcotic Agonists–Antagonists Pentazocine ( Talwin ) Preferred drug for patients switched from parenteral to oral forms after surgery or labor Buprenorphine ( Buprenex ) Treats mild to moderate pain Butorphanol ( Stadol, Stadol NS ) Preoperative medication Relieves moderate to severe pain Nalbuphine ( Nubain ) Treats moderate to severe pain Adjunct for general anesthesia Relieves pain during labor and delivery
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Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer • All Rights Reserved Narcotic Agonists–Antagonists (cont.) Narcotic Agonists–Antagonists (cont.) Actions Act at a specific opioid receptor sites in the CNS to produce analgesia, sedation, euphoria, and hallucinations Indications Moderate to severe pain Adjunct to general anesthesia Relief of pain during labor and delivery
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Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer • All Rights Reserved Narcotic Agonists–Antagonists (cont.) Narcotic Agonists–Antagonists (cont.) Pharmacokinetics Readily absorbed IM and reach peak levels when given IV Metabolized in the liver excreted in urine or feces Cross placenta Contraindications Known allergy Pregnancy and lactation Cautions Physical dependence on a narcotic COPD and disease of the respiratory tract Acute MI or documented CAD Adverse Reactions Respiratory depression Nausea, vomiting, constipation, and biliary spasm
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Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer • All Rights Reserved Narcotic Agonists–Antagonists (cont.) Narcotic Agonists–Antagonists (cont.) Adverse Reactions Headache Dizziness Psychoses Anxiety Hallucinations Ureteral spasm, urinary retention Drug-to-Drug Interactions Barbiturate general anesthetics
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Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer • All Rights Reserved Narcotic Antagonists Narcotic Antagonists Naloxone ( Narcan
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