Shearer R Davidhizar R 2003 Educational innovations Using role playto develop

Shearer r davidhizar r 2003 educational innovations

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Shearer, R., Davidhizar, R. (2003). Educational innovations. Using role playto develop cultural competence. Journal of Nursing Education, 42(6), 273-276 4p. da Silva, J., Megumi Sonobe, H., Scatralhe Buetto, L., Gimenes dos Santos, M., Silva de Lima, M., & Menis Sasakin, V. (2014). Teaching strategies for self-care of the instestinal stoma patients. Revista Da Rede De Enfermagem Do Nordeste, 15(1), 166-173 8p. Reply | Quote & Reply Oct 22, 2015 12:47 PM 0 Like Substantive Post Savita Gilbert 3 posts Re:Re:Topic 2 DQ 2 Kim, Your example of the Jehovah Witness and blood products and what you can do to overcome this barrier while still being respectful of the patients wishes is excellent. The nurse need to be innovative and not one minded when it comes to patient care. Looking outside of the box is beneficial for the patient and instills trust between the patient and nurse showing the nurse is putting the patients values at the forefront of their care. The nurse needs to maintain ongoing education of cultural differences in order to educate themselves on ways to overcome obstacles that may arise due to certain beliefs. At our facility we have a large amount of asian patients. These patients have certain practices that are not seen in other cultures. For example, after delivering a baby they are not allowed to be "cold". These patients tend to keep their rooms very warm, wrap themselves in many layers of clothing and do not shower in the postpartum period. This can pose a risk to their health if the patient starts to run a temperature (the nurse may question if the patient is truly getting an infection or if it is environmental) and the nurse is inclined to cool the room and encourage the patient to remove layers, which is against their beliefs. Provide a compromise with the patient after educating them about causes for fever, such as removing one or
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two layers and cooling the room a degree or two could enhance trust that the nurse is still respecting their beliefs. Patients who have had a c-section are at higher risk for wound infection if the incision is not kept clean and dry. When the patient is not willing to shower and is so hot they are sweating this creates a viable environment for bacteria to grow and cause a wound infection. We as nurses can educate the patient of this and come up with ways to clean the incision daily with warm cloths and lightly cover it with clean gauze for moisture control to decrease the chance of infection. Working with the patient and understanding their preferences and beliefs can foster a positive learning environment. What do we do as healthcare providers when we are being flexible with care, however, it is putting our patients at higher risk for a negative health impact? Do we continue to abide by the patient's wishes, despite the negative impact? Would involving family and support people be helpful?
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