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Marlowe 45 3 6 faustus describes the wonders of his

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for ten dollars more, take him, because I see thou hast a good mind to him.” (Marlowe 4.5: 3-6) Faustus describes the wonders of his horse to the horse-courser, explaining that he is worth more money than the man is originally willing to pay. He praises the horse in a way, which contradicts every other animalistic image in the story. The other instances in which animals appear are always in a negative light. However, the horse does have a
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fault, much like the beasts of The Island of Doctor Moreau. The beasts, like the horse, are capable of completing the tasks assigned to them, but at times they relapse. These two works express many instances in which humanity is questioned and it becomes the reader’s job to discover what humanity truly means. One may not be considered human simply because they act human, like the beasts of The Island of Doctor Moreau. However, they also may be considered animalistic even if they truly are human. This idea is apparent in both novels. The men of Doctor Faustus often act inappropriately and are thought of as less than human, but Dr. Moreau’s humanity could also be questioned. His wretched actions cause lots of pain to the animals he is transforming, but this does not faze him. One of the most apparent traits of humans is their emotion, which Moreau does not have. He shows no remorse towards these beings that he has spent so much of his time creating. The natural instinct of human and animal are what truly set them apart. The similarities are vast, but these novels prove that human and animal are far too different to change places. The beasts ability to form a society did not change the fact that they struggled with following the rules of said society due to their instinct to walk on all fours, drink from a pond, and hunt each other. The men of Doctor Faustus also prove this because their requests to become animals are made in jest. They comprehend the fact that animals hold less importance than men even though they fail to conduct themselves as a “proper man” would. The result of forbidden knowledge in both novels is the understanding that man and human are very unequal even when exchanged for one another.
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Works Cited Marlowe, Christopher. Doctor Faustus. First Signet Classic Printing, May 1969. Print. Wells, H. G. Island of Doctor Moreau. Penguin Group, 2005. Print
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