Vol 23 No 3 pp 66 73 Stone M OBryant H 1987 Weight Training A Scientific

Vol 23 no 3 pp 66 73 stone m obryant h 1987 weight

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Vol 23, No. 3, pp 66-73. Stone, M. & O’Bryant, H. (1987). Weight Training: A Scientific Approach. (2nd ed.). Edina: Burgess International. ELITEFTS DEADLIFT MANUAL 28
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PART III I hate deadlifting. Going the rest of my life without doing another pull would be fine by me. The reason for this is that since my first competition back in 1983, my deadlift has been a struggle. It was nothing like the squat and bench press, which are my strong lifts, and I’ve tried everything to fix it. From deadlifting three times per week, to twice per week, to once a week, to once a month, and (my favorite) not deadlifting at all. However, I never gave up and eventually I was able to build my pull to a point where it became my “means to a total,” and I still look for new ways to build bigger deadlifts today. The difference is now I really don’t care about my own pull but do care about how I can help others pull more. This article is about helping you improve your deadlift. The deadlift is surprisingly complex. While it’s cool to say “just walk up to the fucking bar and lift” that’s not enough—I laugh every time I hear that. If only it was that simple. It certainly won’t cut it if you’re stuck in a plateau—and a deadlifting plateau can be the worst you’ll ever come across. DECONSTRUCTING THE DEADLIFT I hate deadlifting. Going the rest of my life without doing another pull would be fine by me. The reason for this is that since my first competition back in 1983, my deadlift has been a struggle. It was nothing like the squat and bench press, which are my strong lifts, and I’ve tried everything to fix it. From deadlifting three times per week, to twice per week, to once a week, to once a month, and (my favorite) not deadlifting at all. However, I never gave up and eventually I was able to build my pull to a point where it became my “means to a total,” and I still look for new ways to build bigger deadlifts today. The difference is now I really don’t care about my own pull but do care about how I can help others pull more. This article is about helping you improve your deadlift. The deadlift is surprisingly complex. While it’s cool to say “just walk up to the fucking bar and lift” that’s not enough—I laugh every time I hear that. If only it was that simple. It certainly won’t cut it if you’re stuck in a plateau—and a deadlifting plateau can be the worst you’ll ever come across. 3 THINGS Like the bench press and squat, a deadlift plateau is due to one of three issues: Physical – programming, flexibility, strengthening weaker muscles and movements. Mental – level of arousal/over-arousal. Technical – exercise technique and execution. Most lifters think their deadlifting slump is due to physical issues. So they ask, “What exercises should I do?” or “How do I tweak my programming? Do I pull every four days or every five?” They got it all wrong. In my experience, only 20% of deadlifting slumps are due to physical issues or programming flaws. Technical or technique problems represent a full 70% of lifters’ challenges, with mental issues making up the final 10%.
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