Recognise the words by means of Appearance reader may recognise the word by its

Recognise the words by means of appearance reader may

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Recognise the words by means of: Appearance: reader may recognise the word by its shape, length or by an outstanding feature of the word such as the tall “ lls” (as in wall) Association: with a familiar object, person, picture or action. E.g. if a picture of an apple is labelled apple, learners can recognise the word over a period of time, even of the picture of the apple is not present Context : e.g. learners would soon learn to recognise a new word such as “tail” in the context of “the dog wags his tail” Repetition : learn to recognise a word if they have seen it a number of time. Recognise its particular pattern A purely Whole Word approach would not include any phonics instruction. Instead, the focus would be on helping kids to understand how to recognize words in relation to other words, in their context, and as a representation of what the word means. Whole Word approaches always emphasize learning to read through the act of reading. 3.2 The language-experience approach The Language Experience Approach was designed to increase oral language skills and to build an understanding of the need for, and processes involved in, written language (reading and writing). The Language Experience Approach should be seen as part of a reading program with the other part consisting of systematic instruction in phonemic awareness and phonics. Teaching procedures that should be used with the Language Experience Approach: Procedure: Present the topic for discussion. This might be based on a previous field trip, as story that was read to the class, a video, or some other experience shared by the class. Write down the title on large lined chart paper with a marker. Encourage careful observations. 4
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Unique number: 753814 Assignment no: 1 Elicit and extend oral language relating to the students' thoughts and observations. Encourage students to listen and respond to their peers' observations. As the discussion occurs write down students' statements on the chart paper, repeating what you write in the process and making note of the speaker's name. Make sure the students attend to this process. Read what you have written. The whole class reads what you have written. Individual readings, using a pointer to indicate the words as the student reads. Follow-up activities. 3.4 Which of these approaches would you prefer to use in your class? Provide reasons for your answer. The whole language approach to reading stresses the importance of children thinking about their thinking or being metacognitive. The whole language approach focuses on children making sense of skills used in reading and writing, as opposed to just memorizing letter sounds and symbols. The whole language approach to reading instruction focuses on children making important connections between reading and real life. It teaches children to memorize words. It stresses the importance of children learning and making sense of their emerging reading and language skills in relation to other words, not by letter-sound use.
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