TamingoftheShrewElizabethan.docx

Petruccio here sirrah grumio knock i say grumio knock

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PETRUCCIO. Here, sirrah Grumio, knock I say. GRUMIO. Knock sir? Whom should I knock? Is there any man has rebused your worship? PETRUCCIO. Villain, I say, knock me here soundly. GRUMIO. Knock you here, sir? Why, sir, what am I, sir that I should knock you here sir? (I. II. 5-10) Shakespeare has Grumio play with the idea of knocking on the door and knocking in the sense of hitting someone with this short altercation between Grumio and Petruccio. The arrival of Grumio in the play usually incites a joke at the expense of a character. Therefore, punning and satirical language occurs throughout The Taming of the Shrew , all designed for comedic effect, and Shakespeare makes high use of them of these comic elements to liven scenes and gain chuckles from the audience, adding to the argument that the play is reflective of the Elizabethan era. There are two additional features of Elizabethan comedies that are much better examined in fusion, misconception and disguise. Lots of hilarity can arise from the “misconception of the
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Chambers 3 lovers” that transpires in comedies (“An Introduction to Shakespeare’s Comedy”). John Mullan, a professor of English at University College London notes how misdirection adds to the narratives of comedies in his article An Introduction to Shakespeare’s Comedy : “ For the most part, Shakespeare’s comedies rely on benign misunderstanding and deception. They therefore put a premium on dramatic irony, where we know better than the perplexed lovers” (“An Introduction to Shakespeare’s Comedy”). Upon implementing misconception into the story, truths surface only for the audience’s eyes. The dramatic irony Mullan spoke of persist in The Taming of the Shrew . Misconception or misdirection can be found in deals made without Bianca, Katherine, and Baptista’s knowledge. Lucentio and Hortensio lie to Baptista and hide under a guise to procure a position as Bianca’s teachers. TRANIO. And toward the education of your daughters I here bestow a single instrument And this small packet of Greek and Latin books. If you accept them, then their worth is great. BAPTISTA. Lucentio is your name. Of whence, I pray? TRANIO. Of Pisa, sir, son to Vincentio. BAPTISTA. A mighty man of Pisa. By repot, I know him well. You are very welcome sir. [ To Hortensio ] Take you the lute, [ to Lucentio ] and you the, the set of books. You shall go see your pupils presently. (2. 1. 93-103) Hortensio and Lucentio have disguised themselves as tutors so they can vie for Bianca’s affection through a guise while Tranio plays the part of Lucentio. Baptista and Bianca, however, remain unaware of the real identities of Licio (Hortensio), Cambio (Lucentio) and Lucentio (Tranio) until the suitors reveal themselves. This misdirection creates an atmosphere in which the audience members know more than certain characters in the play. The audience is also privy to the knowledge that Bianca’s suitors hatched a plan to get Katherine married off to Petruccio so a
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Chambers 4 suitor could take Bianca’s hand in marriage; all knowledge that Bianca, Katherine, and Baptista are not given access to in the early parts of the play. The introduction also sets up a frame of
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