If the rhetor works all of these things together properly and also doesnt screw

If the rhetor works all of these things together

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that homeless victim's place. If the rhetor works all of these things together properly (and also doesn't screw up ethos and logos), then the audience is more likely to be persuaded. Logos "Logos" is the use of logic to persuade your audience. There are various lines of reasoning that we will discuss (one of them you've already learned in some detail: definition). As the workbook puts it, "A logical argument usually convinces its audience because of the perceived merit and reasonableness of the claims and proof offered in support of the overall thesis, rather than because of the emotions it produces in the audience (pathos) or because of the status or credentials of the speaker (ethos)."
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I'm not going to say more about logos right now because we will address it in detail on Tuesday. Putting them together Seldom is any one statement an example of only one appeal. "As your doctor, I have to tell you that if you don't stop smoking, you're going to die." This statement combines all three appeals. (One of the lines of argument we'll address in future readings and discussion is called "cause and consequence") Don’t forget Always, always, always think about your audience. When thinking about how best to persuade your audience, ask yourself these kinds of questions: What are their values? What do they believe in already? What is their existing opinion of my topic? What are they likely to find persuasive? What might work for one audience might not work for another.
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