Topic of Interest Do State Regulations on Nurse Staffing Make a Difference in

Topic of interest do state regulations on nurse

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Topic of Interest:Do State Regulations on Nurse Staffing Make a Difference in ICU Outcomes?Research Article:Include full citation in APA format, as well as link or search details (such as DOI)Sean, C. (2018). Do State Regulations on Nurse Staffing Make a Difference in ICU Outcomes? AJN, American Journal of Nursing, (12),15. 12.Professional Practice Use: One or more professional practice uses of the theories/concepts presented in the articleUse as arguments for better staffing within my unit. May be used in discussion with state representatives regarding safe staffing issues. Learn from other states what makes a difference and what needs revised.Research Analysis Matrix Add more rows if necessaryStrengths of the ResearchLimitations/Weaknessesof the ResearchRelevancy to Topic of InterestNotesUse of the “difference in difference” approachMakes it strongerTook in account difference in populations of different ICU existAccurate dueto the differencesLooked at not only hospitals in Massachusetts,but also outside of the state.Yes, Good broadness for comparisonCompared fouroutcomesCompared only four outcomesFour area that are closely monitoredMany more variables within an ICU that
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are effectedthan just four.Compared datafrom the year before the legislature and the year afterFair comparisonGood timeframe comparisonUsed only data from ICUin academic hospitalToo narrow of scopeICU vastly differ No nurse outcomesToo narrow of scopeNo financial outcomesToo narrow of scopeSummary of AnalysisI was able to find an article to review that was a scholarly article. It didn’t come with ease as I startedout with a bit of trouble. Every time I found an article I was unable to full up the full text. I believe that I have a system now.My initial thought had to be to find an article that would be of some interest to myself or to my practice at this time. Walden University Library is where I started. I selected a search under the article and typed in keywords that described my interest. The results posted up in the EBSCO host. I reviewed that article to find one that had the scope I was looking for. As I was reviewing the articles, I skipped the ones that did not have an abstract. Peer reviewed articles are more likely to have abstracts prior to the article. After I found an article, I went to the Ulrich Periodical Directory just to verify that the journal the selected article was in was in fact a peer reviewed journal. Then, I went back to the OVID database. This was the only database that was consistent when having pdf files so I could print off a copy of the article. That was my most difficult task was being able to print off the article that I had selected. I went through several articles that I just couldn’t get the full text. The other strategy that I would possibly use is the “ask a librarian” option. I went to that option once, but got quickly frustrated because I didn’t know the class number or my student ID. The flipping back and forth between pages seems nonsensical to me.
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