In order to do this you must be confident in your abilities and teach your

In order to do this you must be confident in your

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In order to do this you must be confident in your abilities and teach your horse to be constantly aware of your position, and to move his body away from you in any case.
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9 Step Five: The first three rides At this point, your horse had been exposed to dozens of “scary” objects, and is now an old pro at being saddled and cinched. It is time that you yourself get on the horse to start the real training. It will initially be terrifying for the horse to see you above him, so begin by allowing your body to be above the horse’s head, without being on his back. You ca n do this in many ways such as standing on a bench by the horse or by sitting on top of a fence, where the horse is aware you are there. As you begin to get on the horse, you want there to be no surprise. Constantly let the horse know you are there by patting him in any way you can. Touch his neck, shoulders, and hindquarters. Use the saddle and the stirrups as movement before you get on. As you shift your weight into the saddle, be aware of the horse’s emotions; what are his ears doing? His eyes? Is his body relaxed? The first three rides are crucial to how your horse responds as it can make or break his trust in humans and having them on his back. You want to make this a quiet and safe response. Once you are on the horse and you and your horse are both relaxed, you can begin asking for forward motion but slowly squeezing with your calves, and making clicking and kissing noises. You’ll begin with just a few steps at a time, and you want to praise the animal for even the slightest forward movement. By the third ride, your horse should be comfortable with your weight on his back, and understand the simple cues in which will allow you to be successful in your next steps of training.
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10 Step Six: Riding your Horse This step of training becomes variable as to what discipline you are planning to use your horse for. However, no matter what discipline, it is important to remember that patience is key. Understanding that a single bad experience can set your training back days, or even weeks. Having a horse’s trust is something you have to work for every day, so it is important to make sure you are keeping yourself and your new horse in safe, and quiet situations. Figure 5
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11 Glossary Discipline: category of riding, typically split up into English riding and Western riding. Grade: An unregistered horse Green: A domesticated horse who is still untrained, requiring an advanced rider Lines: Family tree of a horse’s breed registry Soft : Being responsive and reactive to the bit
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  • Fall '09
  • SPENCER
  • Wild horse, Saddle, Halter, Bridle, Horse Behavior

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