Kaplan2012Theeffectsoftreatmentinstudieswithtrauma...

This preview shows page 28 - 30 out of 34 pages.

Kaplan, 2012). The effects of treatment in studies with trauma-affected refugees not only vary  considerably between studies but also among patients within a single study, with some patients  responding markedly better to treatment than others (Crumlish & O'Rourke, 2010; Nickerson, Bryant,  Silove, & Steel, 2011; Palic & Elklit, 2011). However, we know little about why some patients benefit more from treatment. When it comes to pharmacological treatment, some biological factors, such as genetic  differences in the enzyme cytochrome P monooxygenases (CYP), have been shown to affect treatment  response (Lin, Poland, Lau, & Rubin, 1988; Noerregaard, 2012), while the contribution of nonbiological  factors to differences in treatment response is less well understood. While the papers mentioned above studied the predictive value of sociodemographic variables, pre- migration stressors, or baseline symptoms, the possible predictive value of the patient's current social  situation and psychosocial resources is equally important to study. If different aspects of psychosocial  resources and their relation to treatment outcome are investigated, the resulting knowledge can guide  clinicians in choosing the right treatment for the right patients. Therefore, identifying predictors of  treatment outcome is a crucial first step towards offering individualized treatment on an evidence base.  Consequently, the aim of the current study was to evaluate an index of 15 psychosocial potential  predictors of treatment outcome in a population of trauma-affected refugees.The scale of  MeasurementOne general issue that sometimes escapes scrutiny is whether a scale produces scores at  an interval level of measurement. At an interval level of measurement, the underlying psychological  difference between scores is constant across the entire range of scores. Consider a hypothetical 1-item  scale measuring homophobia: “I avoid homosexual people,” with response options of 1 = Never, 2 = 
Rarely, 3 = Sometimes, 4 = Often, 5 = Always. To interpret scores at an interval level of measurement,  researchers must believe that the size of the psychological difference (in terms of underlying homophobic  attitudes) between “Never” and “Rarely” avoiding homosexual people is identical to the size of the  psychological difference between “Rarely” and “Sometimes” avoiding homosexual people. That is, the  psychological difference between a score of 1 and a score of 2 is identical to the psychological difference  between a score of 2 and a score of 3. There is a serious debate about whether this is true for many 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture