Show Less Samantha Kwilosz reply to Samantha Kwilosz 3152017 30837 AM RE Week 3

Show less samantha kwilosz reply to samantha kwilosz

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Show Less Samantha Kwilosz reply to Samantha Kwilosz 3/15/2017 3:08:37 AM RE: Week 3 Part 2 Sorry, misunderstood the question! If I am seeing 20 patients per day at  $56 per patient visit (20 x $56= $1,120 a day).  With the 1 week for  continuing education, 1 week for sick time, and 4 weeks vacation I  would see patients 230 days a year I would potentially  bring to the  practice $1,120/day x 230 days= $257,600/year.  If we collected 90% of  that I would bring $231,840 to the practice.  If the practice was taking 35% for expenses I could expect my salary to  be around $150,696 a year. $231,840 x .35= 81,144  $231,840-81,144= $150,696 Show Less
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Instructor Romeo reply to Samantha Kwilosz 3/16/2017 10:01:49 AM RE: Week 3 Part 2 Well done Samantha! Thanks, Dr. Romeo Show Less Eric James Bolisay 3/15/2017 11:10:28 AM Discussion Part Two Using the formula from this week’s case study, the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) seeing 20 patients per day at $56 per visit will bring in $1,120 per day. Minus time off for illness and vacation, the FNP will bring in $257,600 per year. Then at a 90% collection rate, the revenue will end up at $231,840 per year for this FNP. The worth of the FNP cannot simply be calculated using this formula though, as other costs and expenses will further decrease this revenue amount. Practice expenses, consultation fees, and contributions to employer profit will significantly lower the calculated revenue from the FNP. Additionally, different methods of pay can also affect income. Employees may receive hourly pay, straight salary, percentage salary, or a combination of the arrangements (Buppert, 2015). Another aspect lacking from this argument is that an employee’s
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value should not be determined solely upon revenue and profit. Intangible qualities such as rapport with patients, collaborating with the team, and quality of work affect the overall worth of an employee but are also difficult to quantify. Another topic that can affect the worth of the FNP is the location of practice. Roles and responsibilities of FNPs vary both domestically and internationally. The scope of practice can affect revenue and reimbursement policies. Kooienga and Carryer (2015) suggest that universal global standards for nurse practitioners (NPs) will improve healthcare delivery and provide identifiable and measurable outcomes. These objective goals may further factor into the worth and value of an NP. References Buppert, C. (2015). Nurse practitioner’s business practice & legal guide (5th ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett. Kooienga, S. A., & Carryer, J. B. (2015). Feature article: Globalization and advancing primary health care nurse practitioner practice. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 11 , 804-811. doi:10.1016/j.nurpra.2015.06.012 Show Less Michael Becker reply to Eric James Bolisay 3/19/2017 8:42:17 PM RE: Discussion Part Two Eric, Thanks for your post and insight on this discussion topic. I couldn’t agree more about how spoke about intangibles lacking in the conversation of
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determining worth. You also used great examples to show what intangibles can look like for the nurse practitioner role. I found an article from 2012,
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