Police brutality lersch and mieczkowski found that

Info icon This preview shows pages 6–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Police Brutality Lersch and Mieczkowski Found that about 7% of police were chronic offenders--they accounted for 33% of all incidents. They tended to be the younger and less experienced officers. This study did not find that incidents were racially motivated. Deadly force: intentional use of a firearm or other instrument resulting in a high probability of death Number of citizens killed by police per year is between 300-500. Although, some consider this an underestimate. James Fyfe NYC shootings over a 5 year period Police most likely to shoot suspects who were armed and with whom they became involved in violent confrontations African Americans were more likely to be armed and be involved in violent confrontations (controlling for these factors made the race police killing relationship disappear) Fyfe also found that African American officers almost twice as likely than white officers to shoot citizens This is explained by the fact that African American officers work and live in high crime, high violence areas. In addition, they are more likely to be line officers and not administrators. Non –deadly force What to do when faced with uncooperative citizen? Use of physical force to ensure cooperation –when is it reasonable? Use of non-deadly weapon –tasers? Dealing with police brutality Police review boards External review boards Civil suits Police Corruption Knapp commission (1970’s) Grass eaters-accept payoffs and freebies when their everyday duties place them in a position to be solicited by the public Meat eaters –aggressively misuse police power for personal gain by demanding bribes, threatening legal action or cooperating with criminals Most corrupt police fall in the category of grass eaters Other ways of categorizing police corruption Internal corruption –Chicago police conspired to sell brand new police cars to other offices for profit Active criminality –two NYC police officers sold witness files to the mafia
Image of page 6

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Roots of police misbehavior Possible explanations Selection effect –those who are attracted to policing share some attributes that make them more likely to behave in problematic way. Training effect –police are either not adequately trained or their training emphasizes the wrong values either on purpose or inadvertently. The nature of the job leads to problematic behavior Selection effect Background of police officers in the past Lower education Immigrant Military More likely to be intolerant of others Less likely to have people skills More likely to be authoritarian Early studies confirmed that police recruits were more likely to have “authoritarian tendencies than average male of similar age” Training effect Found that the military-like police academy training caused new recruits to be more likely to voice authoritarian attitudes and be more cynical about policing
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern