Under the e sign act states may enact alternative

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SIGN Act. Under the E-SIGN Act, states may enact alternative procedures or requirements for the use or acceptance of e-records or e-signatures if   (1) those procedures or requirements are consistent with the E-SIGN Act, (2) the state’s procedures do not give greater legal effect to any specific type of technology, and (3) if the state adopts the alternative after the enactment of the E-SIGN Act, the state law must refer to the E-SIGN Act.
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118           INSTRUCTOR’S MANUAL TO ACCOMPANY BUSINESS LAW, ELEVENTH EDITION C. H IGHLIGHTS   OF   THE  UETA State versions may vary. 1. The Parties Must Agree to Conduct Transaction Electronically This agreement may be implied by the circumstances and the parties’ conduct (for example, giv- ing out a business card with an e-mail address on it). Consent may also be withdrawn. 2. Parties Can “Opt Out” Parties can waive or vary any or all of the UETA, but the UETA applies in the absence of an agreement to the contrary. 3. Attribution The effect of an e-record is determined from its context and circumstances. A person’s name is not necessary to give effect to an e-record, but if, for example, a person types her or his name at the bottom of an e-mail purchase order, that typing qualifies as a “signature” and is attributed to the person. Any relevant evidence can prove that an e-record or e-signature is, or is not, the act of the person. 4. Notarization A document can be notarized by a notary’s e-signature. 5. The Effect of Errors If the parties agree to a security procedure and one party does not detect an error because it did not follow the procedure, the conforming party can avoid the effect of the error [UETA 10]. If the parties do not agree  on a security procedure,  other state laws determine the effect  of the mistake. To avoid the effect of an error, a party must (1) promptly notify the other of the error and of his or her intent not to be bound by it and (2) take reasonable steps to return any benefit or consideration received. If restitution cannot be made, the transaction may be unavoidable. 6. Timing An e-record is sent when it is properly directed from the sender’s place of business to the in- tended recipient in a form readable by the recipient’s computer at the recipient’s place of busi- ness that has the closest relation to the transaction (or either party’s residence, if there is no place of business). Once an e-record leaves the sender’s control or comes under the recipient’s control, it is sent. An e-record is received when it enters the recipient’s processing system in a readable form—even if no person is aware of its receipt [UETA 15].
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