A full list of all species detected the number of sites occupied and their

A full list of all species detected the number of

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and two reptile species were detected. A full list of all species detected, the number of sites occupied and their naïve estimate of occupancy is presented in Appendix 3. The most commonly detected species were black wallaby, common brushtail possum and common wombat. Feral cats were detected more often than the red fox indicating that they were relatively more common across the entire study area than foxes (Table 4). Table 4. Species detected, the number of sites where they were detected and the naïve estimate of occupancy of 12 species used in the modelling process. Common name Species name Number Sites Occupied Naïve Estimat e Black Wallaby Wallabia bicolor 110 0.87 Common Brushtail Possum Trichosurus vulpecula 96 0.76 Common Wombat Vombatus ursinus 86 0.68 Wonga Pigeon Leucosarcia melanoleuca 67 0.53 Bush Rat Rattus fuscipes 65 0.52 a Lace Monitor Varanus varius 57 0.45 Superb Lyrebird Menura novaehollandiae 57 0.45 Short-beaked Echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus 47 0.37 Feral Cat Felis catus 43 0.34 Long-nosed Bandicoot Perameles nasuta 26 0.21 Red Fox Vulpes vulpes 12 0.10 Long-nosed Potoroo Potorous tridactylus 8 0.06 a at risk from fox predation when juvenile 3.2 Modelling the influence of fire, predators and habitat on native species There were varied results across the species’ models. The variable Mean Cover was included in the most models (seven), though the direction of the relationship varied (Figure 3 a–g). Common brushtail possum and Wonga pigeon both had increased occupancy with decreasing Mean Cover (on average 30% and 16% less cover respectively), while bush rat, echidna, lace monitor, long-nosed bandicoot and, particularly, long- nosed potoroo had an increased probability of presence with an increase of Mean Cover . Sites at which Long-nosed Potoroo were recorded had on average 43% more lateral vegetation cover. Summaries of each species model are given in Table 5, and a full table of odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals is given in Appendix 4. All terms were also included in each model alone to determine 12
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The influence of fire, fox control and habitat on the presence of native mammals their individual contribution without Camera Number or Days to the species’ presence, and are also summarised in Appendix 4. EVD_Code was the next most common term, being included in four models. The direction of the effect was different for different species. Long-nosed Bandicoots were four times more likely to be present at sites in Tall Mixed Forest, while common brushtail possum, lace monitor and superb lyrebird (marginally), were twice as likely to be present in Grassy/Heathy Dry Forest. When modelled alone Tall Mixed Forest became important for long-nosed potoroos. Treatment was only significant when modelled alone, despite the fact that this term represented the presence or absence of a fox control program. Treatment was included in the black wallaby (wallabies were nearly 10 times more likely to be present at sites without fox control), Wonga pigeon (three times more likely at sites with fox control) and common wombat (twice as likely to be present at fox control sites) models.
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