Satisfaction i Present solution d Visualization i Describe what will happen if

Satisfaction i present solution d visualization i

This preview shows page 9 - 12 out of 18 pages.

Satisfaction i. Present solution d. Visualization
Image of page 9
i. Describe what will happen if your problem is  adopted e. Action i. Call for a response from audience 3. Works best when the problem/solution are easy to visualize e. Rules for main points i. Should be stated as claims 1. Claim: a. Statement asserting a fact or belief 2. Full sentences, not fragments ii. All points should develop the thesis iii. A presentation should contain no more than five points 1. Called main points for a reason 2. Make your points stick, not just a bunch of wimpy ones 3. Organize into categories iv. Main points should be parallel in structure whenever possible 1. Parallel wording can reflect your organization and dramatize your  points 2. Use similar words for each main point: a. Ex: if your solution will help reduce waste, cut down on  money spent, then use those words for each point v. Main points should only contain one idea 1. Combining ideas confuses audiences 7. Planning the Introduction and Conclusion a. Introduction should take between 10-15% of speaking time b. Functions of the introduction i. Capture listener’s attention ii. Give audience a reason to listen iii. Set the tone for topic and setting iv. Establish qualifications 1. Demonstrate your competence quickly so listeners will take you  seriously v. Introduce your thesis and preview your presentation vi. ***You can accomplish many of these goals at the same time c. Types of opening statements i. Opening statements are difficult ii. Kind of opening depends on your analysis of the speaking situation iii. Ask a question 1. Involves listeners 2. Rhetorical question: a. One with an obvious answer and one that doesn’t really call for a response iv. Tell a story 1. Stories can get the audience’s attention
Image of page 10
2. Keep it brief 3. Story needs to be shorter v. Present a quotation 1. Be careful 2. Let you use a source with high credibility to back up your points vi. Make a startling statement 1. Only works when your statement has a relationship to the topic vii. Refer to the audience 1. Mention your listeners’ needs, concerns, etc viii. Refer to the occasion ix. Use humor 1. Jokes, amusing remarks, etc 2. Need to be appropriate for the audience, topic, etc d. Functions of the conclusion i. Final words create a lasting impression ii. The review 1. Restate thesis and summarize main points 2. Subtler rewording of the same information iii. The closing statements 1. Remember you favorably a. Give your remarks a sense of completion e. Types of closing statements i. Return to the theme of opening statement 1. Going back to where you started gives a sense of completeness 2. Split your story ii. Appeal for action 1. when your goal is to get the audience to act a certain way, you can  sometimes close your presentation by asking for desired result iii. End with a challenge 1. Challenge demands action 8. Adding transitions a. Transitions: i. Words or sentences that connect segments of a presentation 1. Bridge between major parts of your remarks and tell listeners how  these parts are related b. Functions of Transitions i. They promote clarity ii. Emphasize important ideas iii. Keep listeners interested c.
Image of page 11
Image of page 12

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture