Politics of abstract success vs detailed failures

Info icon This preview shows pages 58–73. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Politics of disclosure/revelation Abstract “success” vs. detailed “failures” Overly negative Opportunity to vent (listen, but don’t take at face value) Transference (e.g., personal politics to IT issues)
Image of page 58

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Requirements Gathering Pay attention to What is missing What is NOT said Who is not “at the table”
Image of page 59
Requirements Gathering Recall What makes a good problem/opportunity Types of requirements Stakeholders (Microsoft & Trail Blazers) How to collect data? What to do with it? Transitioning to analysis
Image of page 60

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Requirements Gathering Not just about scientifically collecting data Building political capital Building rapport Building trust Establishing the foundation for an ongoing relation well-beyond the current project
Image of page 61
Requirements Analysis Strategies 1.) Problem Analysis Identify problems & solutions Typically small, incremental improvements in efficiency or ease of use 2.) Root-cause analysis Do not focus on solutions What is the deep, underlying problem? Fix what really needs fixing
Image of page 62

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Requirements Gathering
Image of page 63
Requirements Analysis Strategies 3.) Duration Analysis Focus on time to complete series of tasks Basic steps vs. total time, fragmentation Solutions: Process integration or parallelization 4.) Activity-based Costing What is the cost of each step? (direct/indirect) Focus on the most expensive/wasteful tasks
Image of page 64

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Requirements Analysis Strategies 5.) Informal Benchmarking Study how other businesses perform tasks Focus on “customer-facing” processes 6.) Outcome Analysis What provides the most value to customers? What changes are possible for them?
Image of page 65
Requirements Analysis Strategies 7.) Technology Analysis Review all relevant technologies Match technology to business task, pros/cons 8.) Activity-elimination Review removing EVERY activity in business process How could the organization function without it? What effects would likely occur?
Image of page 66

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Triangulation in Methods Gathering and analyzing data of multiple types, from multiple sources, using multiple techniques One data set trades off the limitations of another 68
Image of page 67
Understanding the Organization Managerial fiat Field research (by firm or analyst) Document/systems analysis Survey / questionnaire Direct observation Focus groups Interviews Join Application Design Participant observation B r e a d t h / C o v e r a g e D e p t h / R i c h n e s s
Image of page 68

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Requirements Gathering
Image of page 69
Survey Design The most common, “easiest” solution When is it the right choice? Broad audience You understand only what you already know Need to understand frequency / magnitude Surveymonkey, Google Survey/forms
Image of page 70

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Survey Design Hard because: You’re not going to be there when the participant is reading it Once you send out the survey, you can’t modify it You have to imagine all the possible ways it could be (mis)interpreted At the same time, you have to be interesting, motivational, and concise
Image of page 71
Survey Design 1. Does the question require an answer?
Image of page 72

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 73
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern