The audience feels pity for both men We dont learn many positive things about

The audience feels pity for both men we dont learn

This preview shows page 15 - 16 out of 16 pages.

The audience feels pity for both men. We don’t learn many positive things about Agamemnon other than his popularity and battle victories. Hamlet involved subplots, such as the plight of Ophelia. The fortunes of both men are suddenly reversed and they are put in a vulnerable position with their murders being plotted. Agamemnon does not involve subplots. The women in Hamlet, while important, are minor characters with little dialogue. Both Hamlet and Agamemnon hurt the women in their lives. The women in Agamemnon have more prominent roles in the plot, with many lines of dialogue. Hamlet seems more torn and reluctant to take revenge. Both Clytemnestra and Hamlet are motivated by revenge for the wrongful death of a loved one and they use deceit as part of their plans. Clytemnestra looks forward to the task of revenge. Hamlet has never been emotionally close to his uncle Claudius. Clytemnestra and Hamlet put aside any previous feelings of love for others as they focus on their task of Clytemnestra has had a much closer relationship with Agamemnon, than Hamlet had with
revenge. Claudius. The events of Hamlet take place over many months Both Cassandra and Ophelia are innocent victims, and capture the pity of the audience The events of Agamemnon occur in one day. Prince Hamlet’s revenge restores order in the afterlife for the ghost of the dead king. He also restores order in Denmark by ridding the country of a wrongful king (Claudius). The Chorus’ dismay reflects the unrest caused by Agamemnon’s murder; similarly, Denmark has been in a time of unrest ever since King Hamlet’s murder. Clytemnestra’s revenge causes disorder and unrest.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture