Advocating a peace through strength policy Reagan declared that the Soviets

Advocating a peace through strength policy reagan

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Advocating a peace through strength policy, Reagan declared that the Soviets must be made to understand we will never compromise our principles and standards [nor] ignore the facts of history and the aggressive impulses of an evil empire. To do so would mean abandoning the struggle between right and wrong and good and evil.Reagan proposed a policy that went beyond the Truman Doctrine of containment, urging active intervention. He vowed to increase U.S. military spending and to use force if necessary to roll backcommunist expansion in Third World nations.Reagan’s doctrine came at the same time as a surge in international and domestic protests against the U.S.-Soviet arms race. His opponents blamed the administration for causing the largest increase in American military spending since the beginning of the Cold War, a policy that swelled the nation’s budget His administration provided military aid to Nicaraguan groups fighting the leftist Sandinista government and gave material support to the Afghan mujahedeen in their ongoing war against Soviets.a.Nicaragua – A country in Central America, a socialist government had seized power. Reagan gave support to anti-Communist rebels there known as “Contras.” Iran-Contra Scandal/Affair –When Congress prohibited further aid to the Contras, some members of Reagan’s administration
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violated the law by continuing to give secret aid to the Contras. This violation led to the Iran-Contra Scandal/Affair that shook Reagan’s second term. b.Afghanistan – Reagan sent assistance to Muslim fighters opposing the Soviet army in Afghanistan. (This is where Osama Bin Laden is said to begin his association with the CIA.) When Soviets pull out of Afghanistan so does the U.S. c.Grenada - October 25, 1983: President Reagan gave the order to invade after Grenada’s Prime Minister was killed in a military coup. The situation on Grenada had been of concern to American officials since 1979, when the leftist Maurice Bishop seized power and began to develop close relations with Cuba. In 1983, another Marxist, Bernard Coard, had Bishop assassinated and took control of the government. Citing the danger to the U.S. citizens in Grenada, Reagan ordered nearly 2,000 U.S. troops into the island, where they soon found themselves facing opposition from Grenadian armed forces and groups of Cuban military engineers, in Grenada to repair and expand the island’s airport. Matters were not helped by the fact that U.S. forces had to rely on minimal intelligence about the situation. (The maps used by many of them were, in fact, old tourist maps of the island.) Reagan ordered in more troops, and by the time the fighting was done, nearly 6,000 U.S. troops were in Grenada. Nearly 20 of these troops were killed and over a hundred wounded; over 60 Grenadian and Cuban troops were killed. Coard’s government collapsed and was replaced by one acceptable to the United States.
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  • Spring '08
  • Mason-Hall
  • Cold War, President of the United States, George H. W. Bush, b. President Reagan

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