1 national defense act 1916 2 sinking of the

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1. National Defense Act (1916) 2. Sinking of the Lusitania (1915) 3. Wilson’s campaign slogan “He kept us out of war” 4. Zimmerman Telegram (1917) 5. unrestricted submarine warfare (1917) 6. Selective Service Act (1917)
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6 07 APUSH (27-35) (1890-1945) (Frameworks) 7. Wilson’s Fourteen Points (1918) B. Although the American Expeditionary Forces played a relatively limited role in combat, the U.S.’s entry he lped to tip the balance of the conflict in favor of the Allies. 1. American Expeditionary Forces 2. John Pershing 3. Liberty Loan drives C. Despite Wilson’s deep involvement in postwar negotiations, the U.S. Senate refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles or join the League of Nations . 1. Paris Peace Conference (1919) 2. Treaty of Versailles (1919) 3. League of Nations 4. opposition of the irreconcilables and the reservationists 5. Senator Henry Cabot Lodge D. In the years following World War I, the United States pursued a unilateral foreign policy that used international investment, peace treaties, and select military intervention to promote a vision of international order, even while maintaining U.S. isolationism. 1. Washington Naval Conference (1921-1922) 2. Dawes Plan (1924) 3. Kellogg Briand Pact (1928) 4. Hawley Smoot Tariff (1930) E. In the 1930s, while many Americans were concerned about the rise of fascism and totalitarianism, most opposed taking military action against the aggression of Nazi Germany and Japan until the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor drew the United States into World War II. 1. Japanese invasion of Manchuria (1931) 2. Stimson Doctrine (1932) 3. Neutrality Acts of 1936-1938 4. FDR’s “quarantine the aggressor” speech 5. Neutrality Act of 1939 6. German invasion of Poland (1939) 7. Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor (1941) III. U.S. participation in World War II transformed American society, while the victory of the United States and its allies over the Axis powers vaulted the U.S. into a position of global, political, and military leadership. A. Americans viewed the war as a fight for the survival of freedom and democracy against fascist and militarist ideologies. This perspective was later reinforced by revelations about Japanese wartime atrocities, Nazi concentration camps, and the Holocaust. 1. Atlantic Charter (1941) 2. FDR’s “Four Freedoms” speech B. The mass mobilization of American society helped end the Great Depression, and the country’s strong industrial base played a pivotal role in winning the war by equipping and provisioning allies and millions of U.S. troops. 1. Rosie the Riveter (1941) 2. Fair Employment Practices Commission (1941) 3. War Production Board (1942) 4. end of the Great Depression 5. Office of War Information (1942) 6. GI Bill of Rights (1944) 7. War Refugee Board (1944)
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7 07 APUSH (27-35) (1890-1945) (Frameworks) 8. victory gardens 9. Navajo code-talkers C. Mobilization and military service provided opportunities for women and minorities to improve their socioeconomic positions for the war’s duration, while also leading to debates over racial segregation. Wartime experiences also generated challenges to civil liberties.
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