Factors Issues etc leading to Revolution Influence of the Ideas of the

Factors issues etc leading to revolution influence of

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Factors, Issues, etc. leading to Revolution Influence of the Ideas of the Enlightenment 1. Human beings should turn to reason (rather than faith) to improve society. 2. The universe is ruled by natural laws that can be discovered through human reason. Adherence to the laws of economics and government will allow human beings to make a better society. 3. All human beings possess a right to happiness. Society should reject the medieval belief that people must accept suffering in this world only to find salvation after they die. 4. Society should protect human liberty, removing limitations on freedom of speech, religion, and property. Inherent problems of distance between 13 colonies and Britain - day to day interaction between the colonies and Britain nonexistent due to the context of the time period - vast ocean, long journey by ship, lack of any real communication - these inherent problems of distance almost encourage independent development Salutary Neglect (significance) - several long periods when the British took a “hands off” approach to the colonies which to a certain extent led to the independent development of the 13 colonies - two longest periods of Salutary Neglect were during the English Civil War (1629-1660) when the British were preoccupied with events at home and during the two generations prior to true colonial resistance against the British (1713-1763) French and Indian War (Seven Years War) - although the war was perceived to be a victory over the French, tensions arose during the war between Colonial Americans and the British that would impact relations in the post war years (a turning point in the relations between the two) - British debt doubled during the war and taxing the colonists seemed to be a way to offset some of the debt and pay for an increase in British troop presence in the colonies The year 1763 (a true turning point) - marks the end of salutary neglect and a much more “hands on” approach by the British toward the 13 colonies - marks the start of the acts, taxes, etc. (see supporting document) imposed by the British on the 13 colonies that ultimately led to Revolution in the 1770s Acts, Taxes, etc. (1763-1775) These are mostly covered in the supporting document so examine it thoroughly. We will emphasize the most significant ones in class so please see your notes, in class assignments, etc. Gigliotti APUSH adapted from James L. Smith, Barron’s Test Prep, and the AP U.S. History Curriculum Framework 6
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Sugar Act, 1764 - British law that taxed sugar and other colonial imports to pay for some of Britain’s expenses in protecting the colonies during the French and Indian War. Stamp Act, 1765 - British law that established a direct tax in the colonies on written documents, including newspapers, legal documents, and playing cards. The tax was designed to raise revenue for the British empire. Protests against the Stamp Act led to its repeal in 1766.
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  • Fall '16
  • Jason Gigliotti
  • American Revolution, United States Declaration of Independence, Thirteen Colonies, James L. Smith

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