But he chose the option that would result in the greatest amount of unhappiness

But he chose the option that would result in the

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to directly confront Mutambara and learn about his reasons behind his actions. But, he chose the option that would result in the greatest amount of unhappiness. So, from a Utilitarian point of view, there is no direct way of knowing the future, therefore, there’s no way of telling whether other employees would follow Mutumbara’s example. But, what we do know is that not allowing Mutambara to use his allowance as he pleases would only result in the greatest amount of unhappiness to the most important people in his life. Therefore, per the Utilitarian theory, NewCom, the company, and Weston, the supervisor, should allow Mutambara to determine the best way to use his allowance, and to continue living in Old Town, if he chooses to. One Nation Under Wal-Mart: Summary: “One Nation Under Wal-Mart” is a case about how Wal-Mart has aggressively taken over the retail sector. It’s stated that Wal-Mart is able to offer its customers lower prices than their competition because they continuously pressure their suppliers to lower their prices. Also, the article provides statistics that show how much percentage of their supplier’s sales they control.
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And the fact is that with every new store that is opened, Wal-Mart gains more control and power in the retail sector, which enables them to pressure their suppliers to lower prices even further, and drive competitors out of business. Opponents of Wal-Mart argue that the retail giant continues to grow their business at the expense of smaller local businesses, which are forced to close their doors since they cannot compete with Walmart’s low prices. Additionally, it’s also mentioned that Wal-Mart 3 is anti-union and pays its employees low wages, which are much lower than those of supermarkets that are unionized. As a result, the burden that this causes ultimately falls on the government, which has to step-up and cover the costs with tax-payer’s money. As stated in the case study, “a two-hundred-employee store costs the government $42,000 a year in housing assistance, $108,000 in children’s health care, and $125,000 in tax credits and deductions” for Wal-Mart’s low-paid employees (Shaw, 2007). Walmart’s low wages and lack of employee benefits offerings also impact retail wages and benefits across the country, because their size enables them to have some control over wages. The case also points out that, given its size, Wal-Mart is able to influence culture in some areas in which they do business in by refusing to sell mature rated CD’s and computer games, and inappropriate magazines while obscuring the covers of others, and Preven, a morning-after pill. However, even with these actions, the retail giant continues to face their biggest barrier at the local level where residents of proposed cities want to preserve their neighborhoods, small businesses, local shopping areas and the authenticity of their local communities.
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