13 The point of the Wilt Chamberlain example Nozick argues that other theories

13 the point of the wilt chamberlain example nozick

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the two principles previously discussed. 13. The point of the Wilt Chamberlain example- Nozick argues that other theories or economic justice inevitably fail to respect people’s liberty 14. How libertarians understand freedom in terms of rights- Libertarians understand freedom in terms of their theory of rights, thus building a commitment to private property into their concept of liberty. According to them, being able to do what you want does not automatically represent an increase in your liberty. It does so only if
you remain within the boundaries set by the Lockean rights of others. Likewise, one is unfree or coerced only when one’s rights are infringed. 15. Amartya Sen’s analysis of famines- more food may be available during famine than in non-famine years—if one has the money to buy it. Famine occurs because large numbers of people lack the financial wherewithal to obtain the necessary food 16. How libertarians and non-libertarians differ in their view of property rights- libertarians- property rights grow out of one’s basic moral rights, reflecting one’s initial creation or appropriation of the product, some sort of exchange or transfer between consenting persons, or combination of these. Property rights exist prior to a social arrangement. They are more than material objects. It also has an abstract form and property ownership is not a simple right but involves a bundle of different rights. Non-libertarians- believe that property rights are determined by social institutions. 17. The nature of the choice and the reasoning people would use in the original position- Nature of choice- each individual will choose the set of principles that will be best for him/herself (and loved ones). Original position- Rawls proposes a thought experiment—individuals are allowed to choose the principles of justice that should govern them prior to any existing political or social arrangement 18. Rawls’s two principles of justice- (1) each person is to have an equal right to the most extensive total system of equal basic liberties, compatible with a similar system of liberty for all. (2) Social and economic inequalities are to satisfy two conditions: to be attached to positions open to all under conditions of fair equality of opportunity, and to give the greatest expected benefit to the least advantaged member of society 19. The point illustrated in the diagram- people in the original position do not care about equality of distribution as a value in and of itself; they want the social and economic arrangement that will provide them with the highest minimum. 20. How Rawls’s theory differs from utilitarianism and libertarianism- Rawls rejects utilitarianism because it could permit an unfair distribution of benefits and burdens. Contrary to the entitlement theory, the primary subject of justice is not transactions between individuals but rather “the basic structure,” the fundamental social institutions and their arrangement into one scheme.

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