1 how do the results for methane compare to those for

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1. How do the results for methane compare to those for butane? Does your experimental data verify Charles's Law?
2. What variables were kept constant during this experiment?
3. Why did you not take a volume reading for the butane gas at 0 °C?
4. Below is a graph of the change in volume of propane as a function of temperature. Does the graph depict a relationship predicted by Charles's Law?
Conclusions: In this experiment, I learned about how different gases show the relationship between volume and temperature. This relationship is stated in Charles’s Law and was proved to be true in both of the experiments I conducted. In the first experiment, I filled a flask with methane and closed it so that none of the gas could escape. A syringe was then inserted into the flask, and a thermometer. After cooling the flask to various degrees, I was able to measure the volume of the syringe, the total volume of the flask and the syringe, as well as the temperature of the flask. When the temperature of the constant water bath increased, the total volume and temperature of the flask also increased. For example, when I began the experiment at a 40 °C water bath, the flask had a temperature of 313.1 K and a volume of 239.1 mL. When I finished the experiment at 100 °C, the temperature was 373.1 K and the volume was 285 mL. As the temperature increased, so did the volume of the flask. For the graph I created, I used the equation v = 0.7641t - 0.0904. This is the slope intercept of the graph, and by using this I was able to identify any unknown volume values not seen in the graph. In this equation, the volume is equal to the temperature multiplied by the slope which I then subtracted the y-intercept from. This shows that the volume is directly proportional to the temperature. In the second experiment conducted, I used the gas Butane. I performed the same experiment, where I used a constant water bath to cool the flask until the temperature remained constant. As the temperature increased, so would the volume of the flask. I observed how the total volume of the flask would increase each time the temperature increased. As the constant water bath went from 80 °C to 100 °C, the temperature went from 353.1 K to 373.1 K and the volume increased from 269.7 mL to 285.0 mL. In the graph shown, I used the equation v = 0.7645t - 0.236. Just like with my other graph, I was able to use this equation to find the unknown volume values. This shows a direct relationship between temperature and volume, proving Charles’s Law to be true.

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