DVD RWDVDRW These formats are similar in functionality and compatibility with

Dvd rwdvdrw these formats are similar in

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DVD-RW/DVD+RW These formats are similar in functionality and compatibility with DVD burners and players. DVD-RW and DVD+RW use rewritable discs that can rewrite more than 1000 times in ideal situations. The majority of stand-alone DVD players play video recorded on DVD-RW and DVD+RW discs, but the compatibility is not as high as with DVD-R and DVD+R. Current DVD-RW burners can also burn to DVD-R. Note: If your DVD burner is not compatible with Adobe Premiere Elements, you can burn the project to a folder, which allows you to use the software included with the burner to burn the final DVD.
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265 USING ADOBE PREMIERE ELEMENTS 10 Saving and sharing your movies Last updated 11/22/2011 Compatibility issues for DVDs When choosing media and hardware, consider the following compatibility issues: The DVD+R and DVD-R formats are compatible with more set-top players than DVD+RW and DVD-RW. DVD-ROM drives are compatible with more DVD formats than set-top DVD players, often because computers can update firmware and drivers easier than a set-top player. Older DVD players support fewer DVD formats. Select the preset for a given format in accordance with the available space on the target medium and the needs of the target audience. Video encoding for DVDs and Blu-ray Discs Making a DVD or Blu-ray Disc involves encoding your video into the MPEG-2 format or the H.264 format (Blu-ray only). Compression reduces your video and audio files to take up less storage space. For example, a 60-minute video in Adobe Premiere Elements takes up approximately 13 GB. However, a single-layer DVD holds only 4.7 GB. (Dual-layer DVDs hold 8.5 GB.) To maintain maximum quality, Adobe Premiere Elements compresses the movie only as much as necessary to fit it on the disc. The shorter your movie, the less compression required, and the higher the quality of the video on the disc. Note: The Blu-ray presets are suitable for exporting AVCHD-quality files. Compressing video and audio for use on a disc is very time consuming, even on high-end, dedicated systems. The time required varies depending upon the speed of the computer processor, the amount of available memory, and the complexity and length of a project. A standard video project of 60 minutes may take from 4 to 6 hours to burn. Many DVD and Blu-ray Disc producers burn a project overnight. Note: The Blu-ray format H.264 is computationally intensive and, hence, takes a long time to encode. However, the compression is high and allows more video data per MB. MPEG-2 is not as computationally intensive, so it is faster, but the amount of video information per MB is less. Creating discs for different geographical regions If you are sharing your DVD or Blu-ray Disc with someone from a different country, you may need to burn the disc using a different TV standard. Typically, video devices (from camcorders to DVD or Blu-ray Disc players) conform to one of two TV standards: NTSC in Japan and North America, or PAL in most of Europe and the Middle East.
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