Getting ready to be creative means getting ready to think learn and share ideas

Getting ready to be creative means getting ready to

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Getting ready to be creative means getting ready to think , learn , and share ideas . Students learn about their own thinking and abilities while they explore their potential and develop a vision for creative success. Select and Combine Prior knowledge is an important asset when matching skills, elements, and techniques with a focused project. Many choices will be made during the development of a project, and each will be based on the impact of the skills, elements, and techniques employed on their own or in combination. Inquiry prompts will guide some decision making and develop mid- point assessment skills. Refine and Reflect A project needs time and the opportunity to be assessed to reveal how it connects to its intention. As part of that assessment, it is important to review previous choices and understand how those choices affect the project. Sometimes this will mean reconsidering decisions, asking for the opinions of others, or repeating a task. Responding to these considerations facilitates confident, polished work. Reflect and Connect Bringing a creative project to completion is exciting, but the learning does not stop there. Every creative project, exercise, or experience builds knowledge, improves confidence in decision making, and refines an individual’s approach to creative
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processes. Reflecting on an experience might spark ideas for a new endeavour that continues to generate new learning. Linking prior learning helps us imagine what more can be achieved. Important Considerations Safety Considerations To ensure a safe learning environment, teachers should ask themselves the following questions before, during, and after an activity has taken place: Are students aware of established rules and procedures for safety (e.g., hearing conservation, health procedures when sharing instruments or costumes, warm-up and cool-down, vocal health and safety, safe use of materials and technologies)? Have the instructions been sequenced progressively to ensure safety? Do students fully understand the instructions? Is the activity suitable to each student’s interest, confidence, and ability? Are students being properly supervised? Are the facilities, equipment, and technologies suitable and in good repair? Teachers are also encouraged to use professional safety reference guides, the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System, and similar orientation resources to support the safe use of materials and equipment in the learning environment. For examples of safety reference materials, see . In addition to ensuring physical safety, teachers should consider the emotional safety of students when planning instruction in dance, drama, music, and visual arts. This includes, but is not limited to, being sensitive to individual students; being prepared to respond to unique situations; and employing creative strategies to deal with rivalry, stress, fear of failure, stage fright, and so on. As well, teachers should be mindful of activities that may cause emotional or psychological stress for individual students (e.g.,
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  • Fall '10
  • Angelica Magtibay
  • arts education

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