CAUTIs are dangerous because they can lead to severe kidney infections CAUTIs

Cautis are dangerous because they can lead to severe

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CAUTIs are dangerous because they can lead to severe kidney infections. CAUTIs may occur at least twice a year in patients with long- term indwelling catheters, requiring hospitalization. They are associated with increased urosepsis, septicemia, and mortality. A CAUTI can lead to urosepsis and septicemia, Infections are common because urethral catheters inoculate organisms into the bladder and promote colonization by providing a surface for bacterial adhesion and causing mucosal irritation. The presence of a urinary catheter is the most important risk factor for bacteriuria. Most bacteria causing CAUTI gain access to the urinary tract either extraluminally or intraluminally. Although catheterization is a common healthcare practice, it presents many risks that must be taken seriously. The complications associated with catheterization include Trauma or introduction of bacteria into the urinary system, resulting in infection and, consequently, possible septicemia or death Trauma to the urethra or bladder from incorrect insertion or attempts to remove the catheter without deflating the balloon Accidental catheter dislodgement Urine bypassing the bladder Urethral perforation Blockage of the catheter Encrustment Urinary stones Chronic renal inflammation 4. Significance of the problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need and its implications to nursing. 5. A proposed solution to the identified project topic Due to increased CAUTIs in our ICU, we decided to try a culture change: the introduction of a new external urinary collection device for females. Piper and Cleland introduced the device in 1993, but it was not accepted into practice. More recently, the female external catheter device (FECD) was piloted by Beeson and Davis (2018) with more success.
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Purpose – 500 words and characters Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs) account for 75% of urinary tract infections in the hospital setting according to the National Healthcare Safety Net. Due to increased CAUTIs in our ICU, we decided to try a culture change: the introduction of a new external urinary collection device for females. Piper and Cleland introduced the device in 1993, but it was not accepted into practice. More recently, the female external catheter device (FECD) was piloted by Beeson and Davis (2018) with more success. Background - limit 500 Most patients admitted to the ICU from the emergency department (ED) or operating room (OR) were already catheterized. Normal practice was to catheterize patients and keep the catheter in for several days to measure accurate output and avoid frequent changes or toileting. CAUTI prevention bundle included daily evaluation of need, perineal care, catheter secured, no loops, bag below bladder level and not touching floor, and bladder scanning for straight catheterization.
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  • Winter '18
  • Tammy Gray
  • Nursing, urinary tract infection, Urinary catheterization, CAUTIs

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