the broad area of knowledge is The interpretation and application of law and

The broad area of knowledge is the interpretation and

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the broad area of knowledge is The interpretation and application of law and includes: the interpretation and application of statutory law (sti); the interpretation and application of case-law (cl); and recognition and understanding judicial rea- soning (jr). The totals in the relevant variables (shown in brackets above) are added together to show how the student has performed in each broad area of knowledge. This is done separately for right answers, wrong answers and unanswered questions. For example, the numbers in the variables chr ; lmpr ; legr ; and csr are added together in total1r to show the correct answers in this broad area of knowledge, while chw ; lmpw ; legw ; and csw are added together in ’total1w’ to show the incorrect answers in this same area. The variables chn ; lmpn ; legn ; and csn are added together in total1n to show the unanswered questions in this area. The same type of process can be used to produce data in relation to other specified learning objectives. Finally, we can calculate the student’s score for the test and place it in score . This is done by taking the number of correct answers (already contained in the variable rans ) and doing whatever arithmetic calculation is needed to express it as a final mark. In the test now being discussed, a mark out of 15 is needed because the test counts for 15 per cent of the overall assessment for the subject. The number in rans is therefore divided by 2.667 and the result placed in score . 6 Presenting Information as Feedback Using routines to analyse the basic data and extract additional information in the way described above is only the initial stage of actually providing feedback to a student. The next step is to build an interface that presents this data appropriately. The information available is sufficient to provide quite detailed feedback if it is built into a careful sequence of explanation, coupled with comment and advice. This should be presented in a clear, friendly, constructive and flexible way. One possibility is to follow
78 Michael Lambiris a traditional web-page design, with a list of contents on the left of the screen to indicate the extent and structure of the available feedback, with direct hyperlinks different sections. See figure 2 below. As far as possible, the feedback should be individualised, by displaying the particular student’s own data. In addition, particular comments and advice can be displayed selectively, depending on whether the particular student has a good score, an average score, or a poor score. The screenshots below provide examples. To script a full range of alternative comments and advice requires considerable forethought but the result is worthwhile. The feedback can also include information about how the individual student’s performance compares to the class as a whole. And it can usefully include information and advice about future tests, for example, what new forms of question will be encountered, and what specific preparation may be needed. Students are very receptive to such information in the immediate aftermath of a test. The

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