This level of trust can be helped with the addition of body cameras to the list

This level of trust can be helped with the addition

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This level of trust can be helped with the addition of body cameras to the list of tools that law enforcement use. "Body-worn technology is not a novel issue. Agencies in the United Kingdom began testing body cameras as early as 2005. Plymouth, England commenced its first tests using a head-mounted video system and continued its use in 2006 during the department's Domestic Violence Enforcement Campaign. After these maiden trials, the Police Standards Unit found that the potential for body-worn cameras to significantly "improve the effectiveness of operational policing" was great. It was reported that, as a result of head cameras in the Plymouth police department, officers had a heightened awareness of their behavior which led to an increased manner of professionalism when interacting with the public. Additionally, numerous complaints against the officers were quickly and easily negated after footage of the encounter was viewed" (Moser 6-7). One of the first projects to study the use of Body Worn Cameras took place in Rialto California. Rialto Police Chief Tony Farrar conducted the study while he was working on a degree at Cambridge University. “The study analyzed the use of Body Cams during the officers' shifts. Two study groups were created. The first group, named Experimental-Shifts, required each officer to wear a high definition Body Cam during his/her shift. The Body Camera 12
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CJUS 230 recorded all of the officer's interactions with the public. The second group, named Control-Shifts, consisted of officers that were instructed not to use body cameras during their shifts. [The] Integrity of assignment was measured by the number of footage-hours against the assigned shifts as well as dip-sampling dates of footage and ascertaining that officers wore cameras as assigned. Shifts were randomly allocated to treatment and control conditions, using the Cambridge Randomizer, on a weekly basis" (Ramirez 6-7). The Rialto experiment produced some impressive results for the proponents of body worn cameras. The use of Body Worn Cameras reduced the total use of force incidents by 59 percent. The rate of citizen complaints of misconduct was reduced in Rialto by 87.5 percent. (Ramirez 7) A similar study was conducted by Arizona State University using the Phoenix Police Department. In that study, multiple groups were formed. There was a target group and a comparison group formed. The target group was outfitted with Body Worn Cameras, while the comparison group continued working without the cameras. The results of the study in Phoenix showed very similar results. "Officer-worn body cameras were found to be beneficial to the officers and the court in a number of ways. First, officer productivity as measured through the number of arrests increased significantly. For instance, the number of arrests increased by about 17% among the target group compared to 9% in the comparison group. Second, complaints against the police declined significantly.
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