The blind faith in this strategy comes from its ability to make significant

The blind faith in this strategy comes from its

This preview shows page 10 - 11 out of 50 pages.

 The blind faith in this strategy comes from its ability to make significant improvements in average life expectancy, infant mortality, literacy, and Gross National Product. Based on this experience development aid from the North is directed to increase economic growth in the South. However, what experts overlook, is the model’s inherent side effect of inequality. The distribution of the benefits is extremely uneven. The result is that people with the most desperate needs experience virtually no improvement in their living conditions. (Trainer 1997.)The growth strategy has the aim to maximize the rate of growth of business turnover i.e. to increase investment, sales, exports, and GNP, as fast as possible. The economic experts assume that the increased wealth this produces, the capitalists will re-invest in society; this will then further increase productivity, and will trickle-down and enrich even the poorest. In reality, very little wealth ever trickles down. The strategy does result in a rapid increase of national wealth, but those who are already rich get almost all of it. The reason that the wealth generated will flow into production of goods, which are attractive for the high-income earners and for export to the rich countries. Thus, the wrong industries will be set up in the South. Rather than producing simple tools, cheap housing, and clean water, all of which are helpful for poor people, capitalists invest their resources into export plantations or car factories. In addition, the rich people in the South often want to spend their money on Western lifestyles. They therefore import Western consumer goods, rather investing their wealth into social production. This will not give livelihoods to poor people. Their choice oppositely gives income to the North. Thus, paradoxically, development aid ends up benefitting the Southern elite and the rich countries in the North,which provided the initial aid, rather than the poor people in the country who received the aid. Consequently, the growth and trickle-down strategy is on a head-on collision course with anything that one can call an appropriate development strategy (Ekins 1992; Trainer 1997.)In this way, development creates a cycle that is exploitative of poor people in poor countries: First rich countries give aid to poor countries. Secondly, the aid benefits activities relating mainly to the middle-class and the elites. Thirdly, these people spend their profit on production of export goods or on imports from the rich countries. Fourthly, inthe process the elite use the natural resources of subsistence living people. Fifthly, the traditional people loose 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture