On page 51 Whit asks George if he has seen Curleys wife What do you believe is

On page 51 whit asks george if he has seen curleys

This preview shows page 15 - 17 out of 32 pages.

8. On page 51, Whit asks George if he has seen Curley’s wife. What do you believe is Steinbeck’s purpose in re-introducing her to the narrative? 9. Explain the following passage and its function in the story: “She’s gonna make a mess. They’s gonna be a bad mess about her. She’s a jail bait all set on the trigger. That Curley got his work cut out for him. Ranch with a bunch of guys on it ain’t no place for a girl, specially like her.” (p. 51) The passage foreshadows later events in the novel—some sort of conflict between Curley’s wife and the men. Because George and Lennie have already had conflict with Curley, the reader can assume that the conflict will involve Lennie and Curley as well. 10. Where does Whit invite George and Lennie to go? What type of establishment is it? What is George’s response, and what does this tell you about George’s belief in his dream? Whit invites the men to go to Susy’s place, a local bar and house of prostitution. George is interested in going, but only for a drink. While most men might be interested in the easy comforts of alcohol and women, George is more concerned about what he is going to be able to save. 11. Describe the situation that occurs when Curley comes into the bunk house. What does this situation illustrate about Curley’s character and his relationship with his wife? 12. Describe the conversation George and Lennie have after the men go in search of a fight between Curley and Slim. George asks Lennie what he was doing in the barn. Lennie tells him that he was petting his new puppy. George is concerned about Slim and Curley’s wife being in the barn together. Lennie insists that he did not see Curley’s wife in the barn. George reminds Lennie that if there is fighting at the ranch, Lennie is supposedto stay out of it. The conversation between George and Lennie is still
Image of page 15
13. What do you suppose Lennie’s statement might suggest, allegorically, when he says, “… live offa the fatta the lan’… an’ rabbits,” especially in light of the way George goes on to describe it (pp. 57, 58)? The way George describes living “offa the fatta the lan’…” for Lennie, is that their dream ranch is lush and abundant in food, providing work, money, and food for the men, as well as stability and safety. As an allegory, the dream ranch seems to represent both men’s
Image of page 16
Image of page 17

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 32 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes