Mode of disidentification of maintaining a distance

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mode of disidentification, of ‘maintaining a distance’ towards one’s symbolic identity, consubstantial with effective participation in social life?” (Slavoj Žižek Contingency, Hegemony, Universality , p. 9). It is precisely the oscillation between success (identification) and failure (disidentification) that makes interpellation as such all the more irresistible and powerful, duping the overtly confident critic who thinks he or she has de-masked, blocked or explained away interpellation’s originary mode of identification. 8. For a genealogy of homo economicus , see Thomas Lemke, “‘The Birth of Bio- Politics’: Michel Foucault’s Lecture at the Collège de France on Neo-liberal Governmentality,” Economy and Society 30.2 (2001); and Michel Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1978-1979 , Trans. Graham Burchell (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). 9. Giovanna Borradori, ed., Philosophy in a Time of Terror: Dialogues with Jürgen Habermas and Jacques Derrida (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003), p. 94. 10. Jacques Derrida, Rogues: Two Essays on Reason , Trans. Pascale-Anne Brault and Michael Naas (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2005), p. 34. 11. Ibid., p. 123. 12. John Yoo, “War, Responsibility, and the Age of Terrorism,” Stanford Law Review 57, 3 (2004), p. 816. 13. US Constitution . Art./Amend. I, Sec. 9, Cl. 2. 14. Wendy Brown, Edgework , p. 47. 15. Jacques Derrida, Specters of Marx: The State of the Debt, the Work of Mourning, and the New International , Trans. Peggy Kamuf (New York: Routledge, 1994).
Neoliberalism, Autoimmunity and Democracy 155 16. Jacques Derrida, Specters of Marx , p. 85. 17. Wendy Brown, “Sovereign Hesitations,” Derrida and the Time of the Political , Pheng Cheah and Suzanne Guerlac, eds. (Durham: Duke University Press, 2009), p. 126. 18. Jacques Derrida, Rogues, p. 153-154. 19. Wendy Brown, “Sovereign Hesitations,” p.125 20. Ibid., p. 125 21. Jacques Derrida and Maurizio Ferraris, A Taste for the Secret, Trans. Giacomo Donis (Oxford: Polity, 2001), p. 27. 22. Jacques Derrida, “Violence and Metaphysics,” Writing and Difference , Trans. Alan Bass (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1978), p. 151. 23. Ibid., p. 84. 24. Ibid., p. 84 (emphasis added). 25. Jacques Derrida, Rogues, p. 60. 26. Jacques Rancière, “Ethics and Politics in Derrida,” Derrida and the Time of the Political , Pheng Cheah and Suzanne Guerlac, eds. (Durham: Duke University Press, 2009), p. 284. 27. Jacques Rancière, “Ethics and Politics in Derrida,” p. 284. 28. Ibid., p. 278. 29. Unlike the phantasm of nationalism or sovereignty—understood as the problematic expressions of an ideological and metaphysical desire for purity—Derrida’s “phantasm” of pure ethics is self-consciously staged, subjected to (self)irony and deconstruction. For an insightful account of Derrida’s preoccupation with the nature of phantasm, see Michael Naas, Derrida From Now On (New York: Fordham University Press, 2008).

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