King helped stop the rebellion but told colonists to leave the indians alone

King helped stop the rebellion but told colonists to

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King helped stop the rebellion, but told colonists to leave the indians alone - The Proclamation of 1763 : drew a line between the colonies and the Indians - Made sure settlers didn’t go west of the Appalachian Mountains Sugar Act - George Grenville proposed lowering the duty on French Molasses from 6 pence to 3 pence, making it more attractive for shippers to obey the law - George was in charge of increasing revenue for Britain - He was the Prime Minister - Reaction: Massachusetts lawyer James Otis attacked the sugar act as a violation of the rights of englishmen - “Taxation without representation”
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Red: Key Term Blue: Mentioned Test Question Stamp Act - Imposed a tax on various colonial documents - Violators were to be tried by vice-admiralty courts , a non-jury British court - Grenville argued that the colonists were “virtually represented” in parliament because the House of Commons represented all British subjects Virginia Resolves - Suggested that Virginia alone had the right to tax virginians - Suggested by Patrick Henry - Colonial Resistance: Non-importation agreements to boycott British goods Samuel Adams and Sons of Liberty - Created groups to protest against British - Sam Adams was John Adams’s 2nd cousin Stamp Act Congress - The congress, which met in New York in Oct. 1765, stated that colonists were entitled to all the rights of British subjects in the mother country - British repealed the stamp act... - But passed the Declaratory Act (1766) that asserted parliament’s right to legislate for the colonies “in all cases whatsoever” Assault on Liberty - The Townshend Act (aka Revenue Act of 1767) established duties on glass, lead, paper, painter’s colors, and tea - It authorized writs of assistance (blanket search warrants) - Colonial Resistance: in Letters From a Farmer in Pennsylvania (1768), John Dickinson argued against taxing for the purpose of raising revenue - Non-consumption agreements (boycott) - Daughters of liberty and homespun: women taking a role in politics A “Massacre” In Boston: The Boston Massacre - “Redcoats and Lobsterbacks”: military occupation of Boston - Confrontation on March 5th, 1770 - Crispus Attucks : freed slave killed in the massacre - Fanning the flames of revolution John Adams - Volunteered to defend the accused soldiers because he wanted to demonstrate to the British that the Americans were not a lawless mob, but a law-abiding people - Adams secured acquittals for all those accused except for 2 soldiers Committees of Correspondence - Intercolonial information networks: spreading information throughout the colonies
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Red: Key Term Blue: Mentioned Test Question Townshend Duties - In 1770, parliament repealed the Townshend Duties except for the tax on tea Tea - The Tea Act of 1773 was a “corporate tax break” so the East India Company could undersell American smugglers Boston Tea Party (December 16, 1773) - Percolated the revolutionary brew - A group of Bostonians threw tea into the harbor to protest The Coercive Acts Are Intolerable - Boston Port Act: closed Boston Harbor to all shipping traffic until the destroyed tea was paid for - Massachusetts Government Act: limited its ability to self govern -
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