Emphasis on the direct male descent through the

This preview shows page 42 - 44 out of 49 pages.

Emphasis on the direct male descent through the changja (first son); reinforced through Neo-Confucian thought - Men often took secondary wives to ensure offspring (specifically male) - First born male got most of the land and the rest was divided up amongst later sons - Families became increasingly patriarchal and you had to be born into lineages, you could not just join one - However, you could be kicked out - This reinforced male dominance Women During the Yi Dynasty - Neo-Confucianism promoted ideas of women being/having the following: subservient to men (their father, their husband and later their son), virtue, chastity, devotion to in-laws, frugal, diligent, faithful and filial - State had literature published to promote this; women were also given virtue awards (1434) - Women faced a steady decline in rights, starting with the disappearance of women-led households and then property rights (inheritance of property lasted until 17th century) for women, then widows could no longer remarry (staying faithful to husband even in death) - Marriage customs shifted where the woman would leave home to stay with her husband’s family - A daughter became known as a todundnyo (“robber woman”) because her dowry left with her and married daughters became chulga oein (“one who left the household and became a stranger”) - Contributed to the practice of limiting/reducing a daughter’s share/inheritance because it would inevitably leave the family
- Women could not divorce men but men could divorce them under the principle chilgojiak (seven grounds for divorce) which were: disobedience to parents-in-law, failure to bear a son, adultery, jealousy, hereditary disease, talkativeness, and larceny - Women were so associated with their families that often times they were not called by their name but how they were related to a male in their family (i.e. “daughter of” or “wife of” or “mother of”) - Not only lost property and life rights, but also identity rights - Women were no longer able to mingle freely with men (especially enforced in the upper class) - Houses had separate rooms for women (anbang literally inner room) and men and women often slept in separate quarters with the living spaces being shared - Especially upper-class women were required to cover up, or only leave the house during men curfew hours (9pm to 2am); separation of religious functions as well - Widows were burdens on the family, literally called mimangin (person who has not died yet) and were sometimes married off to poor men who could not afford a marriage and these were called sack marriages as the widow was often unwilling and was carried out by the new husband in a sack - Taking of a concubine also was not considered as great, even if they were guaranteed a good life because their children had a stamp of illegitimacy and they often suffered the wrath of the wife(s) jealousy - Also was the taking of a younger, second wife which left the first wife feeling as though she had to compete for attention - A paedo became popular as taking one’s life instead of being defiled became the expected

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture