Her daughters about posting the recordings as well as

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her daughters about posting the recordings, as well as a scan of theno longer available Arabic translation of my book (because she hadjust asked me if I had another copy, since someone had borrowedbut never returned hers), she said no. Everyone knew that I hadlived with her family and so would be able to identify people. As Iwas to discover, she was concerned about their reputation.293
AfterwordWhat ethical and political responsibilities flow from our becom-ing "natives" of more than one place? Audra Simpson, an anthro-pologist who sits in uneasy membership in the community ofMohawk about whom she writes, and who has made a devastatingcritique of the way Native Americans, and Iroquois in particular,have been fixed in time and text and harmed by the ethnographicwork of Lewis Henry Morgan, has advocated "ethnographic refusal"as the proper stance.35In doing so, Simpson turns upside down the meaning of the termas it was first introduced by Sherry Ortner.36 Ortner used the termto criticize studies of everyday forms of resistance in subaltern stud-ies, postcolonial studies, and related fields. She accused such studiesof being ethnographically thin and not taking seriously the culturalworlds within which peasants and other subaltern subjects act. Shehypothesized that what lay behind this failure was a Marxist theorythat denigrates religion and ideology; a fear of exposing compromis-ing views or conflict within subaltern communities; or possibly acrisis in representation brought on by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak'sfamous question: "Can the subaltern speak?"37Simpson instead embraces this refusal. She argues that we mustresist the compulsion to reveal everything we know as ethnographers.She does so given what she shows is the history of anthropology'scomplicity in undermining the sovereignty of native peoples-inthe case she studies, native people in the Americas, who were itsoriginal objects of study (remember Trouillot's "savage slot"). Sheadvocates ethnographic refusal as a protective move against the on-going dispossessions of settler states that use their knowledge aboutnative communities to discipline or undermine them. Her fieldworkmade her acutely aware of the way such pressures create tensionsaround authenticity and can produce harsh practices of exclusionwithin such communities.My ambivalence upon returning toVeiled Sentimentsthis manyyears later leads me to something similar. I prefer to think of it as"ethnographic reserve." I have reservations about what I have al-ready revealed. I am reluctant to disclose more. Not that, in my first294
Afterwordwriting of the book, there were not things that I thought best toleave out, either because I didn't quite understand them or becausethey were not relevant. A few were things that I knew it would bea betrayal of trust to publish, since I had chanced to know themonly because people had so kindly included me in their lives.

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Term
Fall
Professor
Abeer Hamza
Tags
Bedouin, Varieties of Arabic

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