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Unless were considering an argument hypothetically

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fallacy, we realize that the disjunctive premise has already tried to sell us a bill of goods. Unless we’re considering an argument hypothetically (what would happen if…?), we as critical thinkers are not ordinarily concerned about what follows from false premises. We should remind you again that some of the letters to editors and the “newspapers” they are alleged to have appeared in—those not credited in the acknowledgments section of IM – 6&7 | 1
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the text—are fictitious. Any resemblance of such letters to those penned by actual people or of the publications to any that actually exist is (more or less) coincidental. Answers to Text Questions Chapter 6 Exercise 6-1 ▲1. Appeal to popularity 2. Wishful thinking 3. Argument from pity ▲4. Scare tactics 5. No fallacy 6. Argument from pity ▲7. Straw man; false dilemma is a strong second choice, and outrage is also a candidate 8. Peer pressure; groupthink is an equally good answer ▲10. Apple polishing Exercise 6-2 ▲1. Red herring 2. Common practice 3. Rationalizing ▲4. Argument from popularity 5. Red herring 6. No fallacy ▲7. Red herring 8. Rationalizing. Not a major example, because he does provide some relevant considerations, but it looks like rationalizing to us. 9. Appeal to popularity 10. Rationalizing Exercise 6-4 ▲1. Not very 2. It tells you that it tastes good; most toothpaste-buyers have no idea of any other feature of the toothpaste they use. They are going by the same advertisements you see in print and on television. ▲3. Very relevant. A popular automobile may have continued support from its maker and this can be advantageous to the owner of such a car. 4. If you like movies that are popular, generally, then it should influence you a bit. But what IM – 6&7 | 2
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kind of movie it is should be more important. Your own experience with blockbuster movies, and with popular taste in general, should guide you here. 5. It probably would influence your decision; but we think it’s far better to make up your own mind independently. 6. It probably will influence what you say about your friends’ party. And that is not all bad. There is no point in offending your friends if there’s no chance of influencing their views. If you think you can influence their views without being offensive, then by all means you should speak up. ▲7. It is a relevant consideration if you want to be polite or if you want to criticize the novel when you speak to your friend. But note that it would not be relevant if the issue had been whether the novel was well-written. 8. Not at all 9. Whether she will do a good job? Not at all relevant. Whether you should vote for her? Quite relevant—she’s your mother, after all! ▲10. Relevant, especially if you have reason to think that Ebert likes or dislikes the same kinds of movies that you do, or if you have opposite views (then you can avoid movies he recommends).
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