B correct answer the main reason behind the new york

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b. Correct answer. The main reason behind the New York draft riots was the fact that the draft law allowed the rich to hire a substitute at just $300 to serve in their place. Those who could not afford such a fee complained that the government demanded “three hundred dollars or your life.” c.The proportion of upstate farmers in the military had nothing to do with the draft riots. d.Racism undoubtedly was a factor, though not as important as the substitution clause. The riot was started by poor Irish immigrants, who hated blacks, shouting, “Down with Lincoln!” and “Down with the draft!” The riots lasted for several days, costing many lives and resulting in the lynching of many blacks. e. With high demand for $300 substitutes, a group of unscrupulous bounty brokers and substitute brokers emerged both in the U.S. and abroad, luring the poor and immigrants with offers of whisky to enlist in the Union army in place of an elite American. Then, these brokers pocketed the money.
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Question 12 a. Washington issued $450 million in greenbacked paper money to finance the war effort. It did not have enough gold behind it, and as a result, its value was based on the nation’s credit. At their lowest, they were worth just 39 cents on the gold dollar. b.Excise taxes on tobacco and alcohol were increased, and income tax passed for the first time, to generate millions of dollars for the war. c. In 1861, Congress passed the Morrill Tariff Act, which increased duties up to 10 percent, to raise extra revenue for the war. d. In 1863, Congress authorized the National Banking System to stimulate the sale of government bonds and standardize currency. Banks that joined the National Banking System could buy government bonds and issue sound paper money backed by them. e.Correct answer. Property taxes were not a way the Union used to finance the war effort. Question 13 a.The Homestead Act did not include any promises not to tax private property. b.Correct answer. The Homestead Act of 1862 promised free land to those settling the West. c.The Homestead Act offered no protections to those who dodged the draft by fleeing west. d.Free gold to California miners was not one of the provisions of the Homestead Act. e.Many people rushed to Pennsylvania when petroleum was discovered there in 1859. While this led to the birth of a new industry, it was not the focus of the Homestead Act. Question 14 a.Correct answer. More than four hundred women posed as male soldiers and engaged in the battle on both sides, but they were not invited or encouraged to officially serve the military as soldiers. b.Women were encouraged to follow the troops and assist them as cooks, launderers, and tailors. c.With men off to battle, women picked up their jobs in government, with over five hundred women clerks in Washington, D.C., and one hundred in the Treasury Department alone. d. Women gladly took on spy missions—no matter how dangerous they might be. One, in fact, was executed for smuggling gold to the Confederacy. e.Among the greatest and most visible role women played was as nurses. Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, America’s first female physician, helped organize the U.S. Sanitary Commission to train nurses, collect medical supplies, and equip hospitals. Clara Barton and Dorothea Dix, superintendent of nurses for the Union army, transformed nursing into a respected profession.
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