541 workload portability in the cloud workloads and

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5.4.1 Workload Portability in the Cloud Workloads and data need to be able to move around . Cloud platforms should make it easy and efficient to securely move customer applications on and off, and data in and out, of their infrastructure. There should be a secure migration path to cloud computing that preserves existing investments in technologies which are appropriate to the cloud, and that enables the coexistence and interoperability of on-premises software and cloud services. Application and data portability, in particular, are key considerations and should prevent vendor lock-in, whether moving to the cloud in the first place or moving from one cloud to another. Application and data portability is a key requirement, whether moving to the cloud in the first place or moving from one cloud to another. Organizations that have virtualized their datacenters have already taken the first step to the cloud. Packaging an operating system, application, and data in a VM reduces disruption from different hardware options. However the provider’s implementation of all the details of VM packing and management may be different from the consumer’s. As a result: The application appliance may not be accepted by the destination cloud. The application may not start. The application may execute but fail to behave as expected. Performance may be poor. Bulk data may move to the cloud incorrectly. VMs may not respond to the management commands.
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NIST Cloud Computing Standards Roadmap NIST SP500 291 v1.0 38 The IT staff’s first cloud encounter of such portability challenges is involved in using IaaS (where the VMs are executed) and PaaS (where data, identity, and access are managed). Standards are key to achieving portability. Building on existing standards and specifications that are known to work and already in widespread use (and documenting how the standards are implemented) allows developers to continue to use their chosen development languages and tools as they build for cloud environments. This keeps migration costs and risks low by enabling organizations to leverage their IT staff’s current skills, and by providing a secure migration path that preserves existing investments. Examples of languages, tools, and standards that are common in the cloud include programming languages such as Java, C#, PHP, Python and Ruby; Internet protocols for service access such as REST, SOAP, and XML; federated identity standards for service authentication such as SAML and Oauth; and standards for managing virtualized environments. Standards continue to rapidly evolve in step with technology. Hence, cloud standards may be at different stages of maturity and levels of acceptance. OVF, for example, is an open standard for packaging and distributing virtual appliances. Originally offered as a proprietary format to the DMTF, OVF was first published in March 2009, and subsequently adopted in August 2010 as a national standard by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). When a provider
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  • Spring '14
  • NIST Cloud Computing Standards Roadmap

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