believed Juliet And here is come to do some villainous shame he has come to To

Believed juliet and here is come to do some

This preview shows page 66 - 68 out of 72 pages.

died!believed, JulietAnd here is come todo some villainous shamehe has come toTo the dead bodies! I will apprehendhim.arrest[to Romeo]Stop thy unhallowed toil, vile Montague!unholy workCan vengeance be pursued furtherthan death?worse5.3.55Condemned villain, I do apprehendthee!arrestObey, and go with me, for thou must die!ROMEO5.3.58I must indeed, and therefore came I hither.that's why I came hereGood gentle youth, tempt not a desperate man!Fly hence, and leave me! Think upon these gone;run away, deceasedLet them affrightthee. I beseech thee, youth,frightenPut not another sin upon my headBy urgingme to fury! O, be gone!pushingBy heav'n, I love thee better than myself,For I come hither armed against myself.5.3.65Stay not, be gone, live, and hereafter sayA madman's mercy bade+thee run away.bid2: beggedPARIS5.3.68I do defy thy commination2,conjurations1: threatsAnd apprehendthee for a felonhere.arrest, criminalROMEO5.3.70Wilt thou provoke me? Then have at thee, boy![They fight]PAGE5.3.71O Lord, they fight! I will go call the watch! [exits]guardsPARIS5.3.72O, I am slain! [falls]If thou be merciful,Open the tomb, lay me with Juliet. [dies]ROMEO5.3.74In faith, I will. Let me perusethis face.look atMercutio's kinsman, noble County Paris!What said my manwhen my betossèdsoulservant, troubledDid not attend himas we rode? I thinklisten to himHe told me Paris should have marriedJuliet.was to have marriedSaid he not so? Or did I dream it so?Or am I mad, hearing him talk of Juliet,5.3.80To think it was so?—O, give me thy hand,One writwith me in sour misfortune's book!you're writtenI'll bury thee in a triumphantgrave.—[opens the tomb]gloriousA grave? O no, A lantern, slaughtered youth,glass tower5.3.84For here lies Juliet, and her beauty makesThis vault a feasting presencefull of light.festive hallDeath, lie thou there, by a dead man interred.buried[laying PARIS in the tomb]
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How oftwhen men are at the point of deathoftenHave they been merry, which their keeperscalljailersA lightningbefore death! O, how may Iuplifted spirits5.3.90Call this a lightning?—O my love! My wife!Death, that hath sucked the honey of thy breath,Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty.Thou art not conquered. Beauty's ensignyetsignIs crimsonin thy lips and in thy cheeks,red5.3.95And death's pale flag is not advancèdthere.—raisedTybalt, lie'st thou there in thy bloody sheet?O, what more favor can I do to theeThan with that handthat cut thy youth in twainmy hand, shortTo sunder histhat was thine2enemy?thy5, cut down my life5.3.100Forgive me, cousin!—Ah, dear Juliet,Why art thou yet so fair? Shall I believebeautifulThat unsubstantial Death is amorous,bodiless Death is your loverAnd that the lean abhorrèdmonster keepshorribleThee here in dark to be his paramour?mistress5.3.105For fear of that, I still will staywith thee,will stay foreverAnd never from this palace3of dim nightDepart again. Here, here will I remainWith worms that are thy chambermaids. O, hereWill I set up my everlasting rest,5.3.110
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