designing IS related diagrams and outputs however it needs a medium level of

Designing is related diagrams and outputs however it

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designing IS related diagrams and outputs, however it needs a medium level of business related skills and expertise. While Critical Success Factors analysis methodology (CSF) requires a high level of business related knowledge and expertise. Therefore, we classify this criterion in 3 level of expertise in two fields of IS and Business: 1) High expertise, 2) Medium expertise and 3) Low expertise. 2.7 Product The other criterion when assessing and choosing a methodology is the support of the methodology and its product and existence of supporting companies to provide services for the people or customers using the methodology in forms of providing them with related software or consulting services. For example BSP is supported, by IBM Company 3 COMPARISON OF SISP METHODOLOGIES Once the framework is introduced, a set of SISP methodologies could be compared based on the framework. The set of methodologies include: 1) Critical Success Factors Analysis (Rockart, 1982), 2) IBM Business System Planning (Zachman, 1977), 3) Porter's 5 Forces Model (Porter Michael, 1979), 4) SWOT Analysis (Ansoff Igor, 1987; Humphrey, 2004) and 5) Value Chain Analysis (Porter, 1985). Table 2 demonstrates the results of the comparison and the evaluation of these SISP Methodologies. This comparison requires further validation through empirical research which will be accomplished as the next step of the research process. (See table 2 in the Appendix) 4 CONCLUSIONS Since the selection of proper SISP methodology(ies) to develop the IS plan has been proven as a success factor of the IS planning process, the purpose of this theoretical paper was to propose a conceptual framework to classify SISP methodologies to choose the suitable methodology(ies) according to the specific given requirements of an organisation. Using this proposed conceptual framework, one could compare SISP methodologies to benefit from the mostly suited one(s) to the organisation’s requirements and also may combine a set of methodologies in order to cover all SISP phases and tasks in a full scope manner. The next phase in current research in progress work is to concentrate on the application of this conceptual framework in empirical research in order to assess the validity and reliability of this re search’s results. REFERENCES Ansoff Igor, H. (1987). Corporate strategy: London, Penguin Books. Avison, D., & Fitzgerald, G. (2006). Methodologies for Developing Information Systems: A Historical Perspective. The Past and Future of Information Systems: 1976 2006 and Beyond, 27-38. Avison, D., & Fitzgerald, G. (2003). Information systems development: methodologies, techniques and tools. Banker, R., Kauffman, R., & Morey, R. (1990). Measuring gains in operational efficiency from information technology: a study of the Positran deployment at Hardee's Inc. Journal of Management Information Systems, 29-54.
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