Step 1 find the mean of each sample step 2 make a box

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Step 1: Find the mean of each sample. Step 2: Make a box-and-whisker plot of the sample means. Step 3: Use the box-and-whisker plot to estimate the actual mean number of hours students with part-time jobs work each week. How does your estimate compare to the mean of the entire data set? Work with a partner. Another way to generate multiple samples of data is to use a simulation. Suppose 70% of all seventh graders watch reality shows on television. Step 1: Design a simulation involving 50 packing peanuts by marking 70% of the peanuts with a certain color. Put the peanuts into a paper bag. Step 2: Simulate choosing a sample of 30 students by choosing peanuts from the bag, replacing the peanut each time. Record the results. Repeat this process to generate eight more samples. How much variation do you expect among the samples? Explain. Step 3: Display your results. ACTIVITY: Using Measures from Multiple Random Samples 2 ACTIVITY: Using a Simulation 3 Hours Worked Each Week 1: 6, 8, 6, 6, 7, 4, 10, 8, 7, 8 2: 10, 4, 4, 6, 8, 6, 7, 12, 8, 8 3: 10, 9, 8, 6, 5, 8, 6, 6, 9, 10 4: 4, 8, 4, 4, 5, 4, 4, 6, 5, 6 5: 6, 8, 8, 6, 12, 4, 10, 8, 6, 12 6: 10, 10, 8, 9, 16, 8, 7, 12, 16, 14 7: 4, 5, 6, 6, 4, 5, 6, 6, 4, 4 8: 16, 20, 8, 12, 10, 8, 8, 14, 16, 8
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448 Chapter 10 Probability and Statistics Comparing Populations 10.7 Work with a partner. You want to compare the shoe sizes of male students in two classes. You collect the data shown in the table. Male Students in Eighth-Grade Class 7 9 8 7 1 2 8 1 2 10 6 6 1 2 8 8 8 1 2 9 11 7 1 2 8 1 2 Male Students in Sixth-Grade Class 6 5 1 2 6 6 1 2 7 1 2 8 1 2 7 5 1 2 5 5 1 2 6 1 2 7 4 1 2 6 6 a. How can you display both data sets so that you can visually compare the measures of center and variation? Make the data display you chose. b. Describe the shape of each distribution. c. Complete the table. d. Compare the measures of center for the data sets. e. Compare the measures of variation for the data sets. Does one data set show more variation than the other? Explain. f. Do the distributions overlap? How can you tell using the data display you chose in part (a)? g. The double box-and-whisker plot below shows the shoe sizes of the members of two girls basketball teams. Can you conclude that at least one girl from each team has the same shoe size? Can you conclude that at least one girl from the Bobcats has a larger shoe size than one of the girls from the Tigers? Explain your reasoning. 4 6 5 7 8 9 11 10 12 Shoe sizes Bobcats Tigers ACTIVITY: Comparing Two Data Distributions 1 How can you compare data sets that represent two populations? Probability and Statistics In this lesson, you will use measures of center and variation to compare populations. use random samples to compare populations. Mean Median Mode Range Interquartile Range (IQR) Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) Male Students in Eighth-Grade Class Male Students in Sixth-Grade Class
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Section 10.7 Comparing Populations 449 Work with a partner. Compare the shapes of the distributions. Do the two data sets overlap? Explain. If so, use measures of center and the least and the greatest values to describe the overlap between the two data sets.
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