How messed up you ask put it this way lets pretend

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How messed up you ask? Put it this way: Let's pretend that, one day, a group of aliens barge into your lunchroom cafeteria and confiscate all the knives and forks. "Silly humans," they say, "you aren't supposed to eat with such primitive tools. Here, use our alien mini-catapults instead— much more efficient." The next day, you're sitting in church when the door flies open. "What sort of god are you worshipping here?" ask the aliens. "That's cute, but it's not the real god. Here, enjoy this statue of Raxon the Galactic. Now pray to him as we do." And did we mention that these aliens have laser guns to persuade you? It may sound like something out of a science fiction flick (okay, a bad sci-fi flick), but that's essentially the way that colonialism worked in the nineteenth century. People were happily living their lives when—out of nowhere—strange foreigners showed up and forced them to change, overnight, at gunpoint. This is obviously not cool by today's standards. But the legacy of these actions—as well as the philosophy that defended colonialism as a moral duty—can still be felt today. After all, we're just two or three generations removed from this line of thinking. Reading Rudyard Kipling's "White Man's Burden," then, gives us an inside look at what those aliens were thinking when they tried to take over the world. And understanding the motivations for these horrible acts —no matter how twisted and illogical they might be—is the first step in making sure nothing like that ever happens again. 3. “Since even ignorant commoners are talking in this way, I fear that if the bakufu does not decide to carry out expulsion, if its handling of the matter shows nothing but excess of leniency and appeasement of the foreigners, then the lower orders may fail to understand its ideas and hence opposition might rise from evil men who have lost their respect for bakufu authority. It might even be that bakufu control of the great lords would itself be endangered. That is the ninth reason why we must never choose the policy of peace.” (Tokugawa Nariaki “Debates over the Opening of Japan” 1853) Author: Tokugawa Nariaki. He was a daimyo who was against giving in to foreign demands.
When: 1853 (also when western powers arise with the United States ***) Meaning: In 1853 Tokugawa Nariaki was involved in a debate as to whether Japan should adopt a stance of kaikoku or sonno joi. Nariaki is arguing for the sonno joi position which is a position of attacks the westerns and making them leave Japan. The subject is the opening of Japan to foreign trade and interactions. 10 reasons why Japan should fight: 1. war to expel the barbarians could boost the nation’s morale. Allowing them to roam on Japanese territory is a disgrace and would be impossible to maintain national policy.

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