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B no c its difficult to say 2 what argument flag

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b) No. c) It’s difficult to say. 2. What argument flag suggests that it might be an argument? a) The text (“Fossil fuels are the only hope for a better future.”) suggests that it might be an argument. b) The broken wind turbines and solar panels suggest that it might be an argument. c) The smartphones and computers swirling around the cars and pipelines suggest that it might be an argument. 3. The hidden main conclusion of this argument is ________. a) “Cars require fossil fuels” b) “The future is not in wind or solar energy” c) not hidden; it is “Fossil fuels are the only hope for a better future” 4. The hidden premises in this argument are ________. a) “Technological improvement requires fossil fuels” and “Technological improvement is the only hope for a better future” b) “Smartphones require fossil fuels” and “Smartphones are the only hope for a better future” c) “Computers don’t run on wind or solar energy” and “Fossil fuels are the only hope for a better future” 5. The hidden conclusion in this argument is ________. a) “Fossil fuels are the only hope for a better future” b) “Smartphones and other new technologies rely on fossil fuels” c) There are no hidden conclusions. 6. Given the legend you have just constructed and the hidden premises and conclusion(s), which of the following is the correct argument diagram? a) HP1 + HP2 MC b) HP1 HP2 MC
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Good Reasoning Matters! A Constructive Approach to Critical Thinking , Fifth Edition © Oxford University Press Canada, 2012 Main Review Question Select three advertisements—they can be in any format, including online, in print, and on TV. Diagram them fully, including all hidden premises and hidden conclusions. Then, evaluate these arguments—that is, determine if they are strong or weak. Are there some forms of advertising that make for better arguments? Are all ads good arguments, or are all ads bad arguments? Look for more examples if you’re having trouble deciding. For ideas on how to proceed with non-verbal arguments, see pp. 143–158. For evaluation, refer to Chapter 3.
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Good Reasoning Matters! A Constructive Approach to Critical Thinking , Fifth Edition © Oxford University Press Canada, 2012 Answer Key Passage 1 1. b) “It’s not true that I’m unreliable.” The argument implies that Fulton has done something untrustworthy, related to calling me unreliable. It seems plausible to interpolate that what Fulton has said is untrue. See pp. 138–141. 2. c) “My best friend has lied about me.” Given P1, and the hidden premise identified above, it follows that my best friend has lied about me. But, this is not stated in the legend, so it is a hidden conclusion. See pp. 135–137. 3.
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b No c Its difficult to say 2 What argument flag suggests...

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