According to Mount S2010 First the Legislative branch makes the law Second the

According to mount s2010 first the legislative branch

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According to Mount, S.(2010), “First, the Legislative branch makes the law. Second, the Executive branch executes the law. Last, the Judicial branch interprets the law. Each branch influences the other.” This is known as checks and balances. The Legislative branches checks
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3 and balances on the Executive branch include but are not limited to overriding Presidential vetoes, enacting taxes, and power to declare war. The checks that are on the judiciary consist of approval of federal judges, power to initiate constitutional amendments, and setting jurisdiction of courts. They also have checks and balances on themselves as well. These consist of originating bills that increase income, all quarterlies are available for viewing, and bills must go through both the House of Representative and the Senate. The Executive branch checks on the Legislature are veto power, recess appointments, and may call an emergency session into order for either house or both houses. Their checks on the Judiciary division is the power to appoint judges and the power to pardon. The self-check of the Executive branch is that the Cabinet and the Vice President can take a vote on the President’s ability to perform his duties as Commander in Chief. The Judicial branch also has checks on the Legislative and Executive branches. The checks it has on the Legislature are judicial review, seats are kept by good behavior, and their pay cannot be lessened. Checks on the Executive are also judicial review and the Chief Justice sits in as the President during a presidential impeachment. Congress and the President are granted certain powers under the U.S. Constitution. Congress is given the authority to create laws, make money, and declare war when necessary. The President is the Commander in Chief of the military. He or she can commission officers, allow for a pardon, and execute the laws that Congress has enacted. However, a few presidents have taken it upon themselves to extend the power of the President. When Abraham Lincoln was
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  • Fall '15
  • Separation of Powers, President of the United States, United States Congress, United States Senate

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